Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction


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Lorentz–FitzGerald contraction

(lŏ-rents fits-je -răld) The tiny contraction of a moving body in the direction of motion, put forward by H.A. Lorentz (1895) and independently by G.F. FitzGerald (1893) as an explanation for the result of the Michelson–Morley experiment (see ether). The contraction was later shown to be an effect of the special theory of relativity (1905).

Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction

[′lȯr‚ens fits′jer·əld kən‚trak·shən]
References in periodicals archive ?
When the Lorentz-Fitzgerald contraction was first introduced, it was considered to be a real physical effect in Euclidean space to account for the null results of the Michelson-Morley experiment.
The Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction was borne out, but physicists had to wait five more years before a comprehensive physical theory that explained it was advanced.
In other words we have replaced the use of the Lorentz-Fitzgerald contraction by counting charges, and counting is relativistically invariant.