Lorenz curve

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Lorenz curve

[′lȯr‚ens ‚kərv]
(statistics)
A graph for showing the concentration of ownership of economic quantities such as wealth and income; it is formed by plotting the cumulative distribution of the amount of the variable concerned against the cumulative frequency distribution of the individuals possessing the amount.
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To give an overview of our analysis, in Figure 1 we start with three Lorenz curves. A Lorenz curve is a visual representation of inequality.
Section 2 describes the main methodological aspects, namely the Lorenz curves, the Parade approach and the different inequality measures.
Pareto Lorenz curves for panchagavya samples drawn at different stages showed that the curve values for all the samples were more than 80 per cent on Y axis at a 20 per cent intercept on X-axis.
The comparative visual and graphical display of empirical and parametric Lorenz curves of all the considered distribution models for both of our data sets is provided.
Welfare economics uses Lorenz curves to display skewed income distributions and Gini indices to summarize the skewness.
The Lame class of Lorenz curves. Communications in Statistics.
Different approaches for refining the ranking of income distributions in cases where the Lorenz curves intersect are described in several papers.
Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, Table S1901.) Income limits for each fifth of all households can then be used to derive Lorenz curves and Gini ratios.
Figure 4 shows the empirical Lorenz curves relating to the distributions of gross income and income tax in Ireland in 2010, the latest year for which finalised data are available from Revenue in its publicly available Statistical Reports (at the time the analysis was carried out in 2013).
The distribution of low-wage densities across employers is also illustrated by Lorenz curves. Lorenz curves show the cumulative frequency of firms ranked according to their low-wage density.
Generating ordered families of Lorenz curves by strongly unimodal distributions.