Lorimer, George Horace

Lorimer, George Horace

(lôr`ĭmər), 1867–1937, American editor, b. Louisville, Ky. After working for the Armour Packing Company (1887–95) and as a wholesale grocer, he went to work as a newspaper reporter in Boston. He became editor in chief of the Saturday Evening Post in 1899, and until 1936 his guidance was responsible for its growth. His success was attributed to his ability to ascertain the literary tastes of the middle class. He was president (1932–34) of the Curtis Publishing Company. Letters from a Self-made Man to His Son (1902) was reprinted from the Post.

Bibliography

See J. Tebbel, George Horace Lorimer and the Saturday Evening Post (1948).

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Lorimer, George Horace

(1868–1937) editor; born in Louisville, Ky. After early success in a meat-packing company and early failure as a retail grocer, he turned to reporting, and, in 1898, won a job from Cyrus H. K. Curtis as literary editor of Curtis's newly acquired Saturday Evening Post. He was soon promoted to editor in chief. In his long tenure (1899–1936) he attracted such talented contributors as Mary Roberts Rinehart, Ring Lardner, Sinclair Lewis, Kenneth Roberts, and John P. Marquand. Aided by a solid instinct for public taste, he succeeded in reaching a broad audience that, at the peak of the Post 's popularity, exceeded 3 million people. His editorials reflected a basically conservative view, and his vision of America was typified in the popular wholesome Post covers, especially those drawn by Norman Rockwell. Lorimer thought himself closely in tune with the American public and was dismayed toward the end of his career by the popularity of New Deal policies.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.