Virginity

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Virginity

See also Chastity, Purity.
Agnes, St.
patron saint of virgins. [Christian Hagiog.: Brewer Dictionary, 16]
Atala
Indian maiden learns too late she can be released from her vow to remain a virgin. [Fr. Lit.: Atala]
Athena
goddess who had no love affairs and never married, called Parthenos, ‘the Virgin.’ [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 60]
Cecilia, St.
consecrated self to God, bridegroom followed suit. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 81–82]
Chrysanthus and Daria, Sts.
sexless marriage for glory of God. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 86]
Drake, Temple
chastity makes her the object of attacks. [Am. Lit.: Sanctuary]
garden, enclosed
wherein grow the red roses of chastity. [Christian Symbolism: De Virginibus, Appleton, 41]
Josyan
steadfastly retains virginity for future husband. [Br. Lit.: Bevis of Hampton]
Lygia
foreign princess remains chaste despite Roman orgies. [Polish Lit.: Quo Vadis, Magill I, 797–799]
lily
symbol of Blessed Virgin; by extension, chastity. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 57–58]
ostrich egg
symbolic of virgin birth. [Art: Hall, 110]
red and white roses, garland of
emblem of virginity, esp. of the Virgin Mary. [Christian Iconog.: Jobes, 374]
Vestals
six pure girls; tended fire sacred to Vesta. [Rom. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1127]
Virgin Mary, Blessed
mother of Jesus. [Christianity: NCE, 1709]
References in periodicals archive ?
This study also extended previous research in assessing whether students would (a) classify a sexual encounter with a same-sex partner as involving having sex, a sexual partner, or a loss of virginity, and (b) differ in the importance placed on dating status as a function of the gender of the "partner" involved (i.e., the same or opposite sex as the participant).
The Broken Jug is an Adam and Eve tale, in which the central image is also symbolical of loss of virginity. Its plot centers on a character who is both criminal and judge, a moral knot similar to the kind that vex many a Banville protagonist.
"Loss of virginity is not merely because of sexual activities.
The earlier studies in this group presuppose the "loss of virginity" to be an exclusively heterosexual act but recognize a spectrum of sexual activity along which respondents locate the transition from virgin to non-virgin (Berger and Wenger 668-73).
The exclusion of girls who are pregnant implies loss of virginity, therefore automatic disqualification from marriageability.
Though the general air of willful transgression that characterized the period is well-rendered, the loss of virginity motif as a parallel for Spain's maturing into democracy is given no new twists here, while the story of the band is pretty unsubtle as drama.