Virginity

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Virginity

See also Chastity, Purity.
Agnes, St.
patron saint of virgins. [Christian Hagiog.: Brewer Dictionary, 16]
Atala
Indian maiden learns too late she can be released from her vow to remain a virgin. [Fr. Lit.: Atala]
Athena
goddess who had no love affairs and never married, called Parthenos, ‘the Virgin.’ [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 60]
Cecilia, St.
consecrated self to God, bridegroom followed suit. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 81–82]
Chrysanthus and Daria, Sts.
sexless marriage for glory of God. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 86]
Drake, Temple
chastity makes her the object of attacks. [Am. Lit.: Sanctuary]
garden, enclosed
wherein grow the red roses of chastity. [Christian Symbolism: De Virginibus, Appleton, 41]
Josyan
steadfastly retains virginity for future husband. [Br. Lit.: Bevis of Hampton]
Lygia
foreign princess remains chaste despite Roman orgies. [Polish Lit.: Quo Vadis, Magill I, 797–799]
lily
symbol of Blessed Virgin; by extension, chastity. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 57–58]
ostrich egg
symbolic of virgin birth. [Art: Hall, 110]
red and white roses, garland of
emblem of virginity, esp. of the Virgin Mary. [Christian Iconog.: Jobes, 374]
Vestals
six pure girls; tended fire sacred to Vesta. [Rom. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1127]
Virgin Mary, Blessed
mother of Jesus. [Christianity: NCE, 1709]
References in periodicals archive ?
Fewer women considered oral-genital contact with the opposite sex to involve a loss of virginity (3%-10%) as compared to men (13%-31%), whereas the converse was true regarding this behaviour with the same sex (women = 18%-29%; men = 7%-16%).
The myth of the broken hymen symbolising loss of virginity is very deeply ingrained in our society.
The same behavior was exhibited in Kosovo, especially degrading the lives of Muslim women, many of whom cannot subsequently marry if the rapes and loss of virginity become known.
When Wolf analyses the stories, pulling them together into themes such as date rape, loss of virginity, and body image, her tone is often earnest to the point of being onerous.
Munich examines the use of lilies and Lilys in texts from 1892-1898 cautioning readers that "although the lilies under consideration here are represented as maidens, it would be useful to keep in mind the sexual ambiguity of the symbol, a symbol that frequently has as its subtext a distaste for loss of virginity by heterosexual means" (143).
There's a certain loss of virginity that happened in the entire process that, like any othe loss of virginity, cannot be reversed," said Chris Isidore, a SCAMP reporter who helped organize the unsuccessful employee bid for the paper.