Lotophagi


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Lotophagi:

see lotus-eaterslotus-eaters
or Lotophagi
, a fabulous people who occupied the north coast of Africa and lived on the lotus, which brought forgetfulness and happy indolence. They appear in the Odyssey. When Odysseus landed among them, some of his men ate the food.
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Lotophagi

African people, eaters of an amnesia-inducing fruit. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Br. Lit.: “The Lotus-Eaters” in Norton, 733–736]
References in periodicals archive ?
Some believe that it is a variety of ground jujube that was the food of the Lotophagi. See Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, A History of Food, tr.
We all can understand the porcine lotophagi of Greek legend, the shamefully debased people whom Homer represents as eating lotus so as to enter a state of dreamy forgetfulness where there is a "loss of all desire to return home." Here is the delicious sin of wallowing in being less than human, and in a foretaste of death, it would seem.
Lotus-Eaters , Greek Lotophagoi, Latin Lotophagi. In Greek mythology, a tribe encountered by the hero Odysseus on the Libyan coast, after a north wind had driven him and his men from Cape Malea.