lotus-eater

(redirected from Lotus Eater)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

lotus-eater

Greek myth one of a people encountered by Odysseus in North Africa who lived in indolent forgetfulness, drugged by the fruit of the legendary lotus
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Though a more credible, if more dour, character than the callow Miranda, Helen Adams, the photojournalist protagonist of Tatjani Soli's novel The Lotus Eaters, shares her earlier fictional sister's ill-defined motivation for going to the war as well as her initially dubious credentials as a journalist.
In our own right, we have eluded sirens' voices, dodged the lotus eaters, tricked the drooling Cyclops, navigated past clashing rocks, entered the cave of winds and threaded arrows through impossible hoops with unbendable bows.
THE LOTUS EATERS provides an excellent blend of military science fiction and action as it tells of Carrera, who has won a war that proves to be only the first in a series.
It is mentioned by Homer in Odysseus, and in the late 19th century attracted prominent artists and writers such as John Singer Sargent, Maxim Gorky and Somerset Maugham, who based his famous poem 'Lotus Eaters' on it.
It was the time of lotus eaters, when inhabitants of the shifting sandbanks near Carthage could suck at fruit whose roots drew water from the underworld, causing forgetfulness of the past as well as eliminating all concept of the future.
such as Night of the Lotus Eaters and Lie Down Here (& Be My Girl) but the mighty We Call Upon the Author was the song of the evening.
For example, the Lotus Eaters analogize the numbing of pain, the Cyclops is the penultimate bully, and the Siren's song represents unhealthy temptations such as drugs, alcohol, and sexual misbehavior.
When the lotus eaters appear, a car, helpfully labelled Lotus, is wheeled on.
When the lotus eaters begin to degrade all that was so costly won and the weaknesses begin to become apparent, the lotus eaters build walls to deter the advance of the barbarian.
Wood had this to say about the story's lotus eaters, who are rendered blissfully idle after eating the flesh of the fruit: "Look at those people sitting at bars - those are the lotus-eaters.
Homer refers to Odysseus spending time in the land of the Lotus Eaters, and approaching the underworld through fields of asphodel.
Not content like the Lotus Eaters of Homer's Odyssey with the essence of the fruit itself, the inhabitants of this island took to mass-producing a chemical substance which mimicked the effects of this fruit.