Bromfield, Louis

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Bromfield, Louis

(1896–1956) writer; born in Mansfield, Ohio. The son of a farmer, Bromfield left the family farm in 1914 when he entered Cornell University to study agriculture. His interest in writing led him to transfer to Columbia University's school of journalism (1915). In 1916 he went to France where he served with distinction with the American Ambulance Corps. After the war, he was awarded an honorary B.A. by Columbia and had a series of jobs in journalism before publishing his first novel, The Green Bay Tree (1924). The rest of the tetralogy followed swiftly: Possession (1925), Early Autumn (Pultizer Prize, 1926), A Good Woman (1927). Success allowed Bromfield to return to Ohio, where his farm, Malabar, was a showcase of modern, scientific agricultural methods. He published short stories and novels throughout the 1930s and 1940s, but none received the acclaim of his early works.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pulitzer prize-winning author Louis Bromfield (1896-1956) wrote eloquently about the importance of rural life and sustainable agriculture to our collective future.
In Malabar Farm Louis Bromfield said, "There are dead soils and living soils.
Doris Duke (older age) Lauren Bacall Bernard Lafferty Richard Chamberlain Nanaline Duke Kathleen Quinlan Buck Duke Joe Don Baker Chandi Heffner Mare Winningham Louis Bromfield Brian Dennehy Porfirio Rubirosa Michael Nouri Doris Duke (ages 20s to 50s) Lindsay Frost Duke Kahanamoku Brian Stokes Mitchell Alec Cunningham-Reid Liam Cunningham James Cromwell Howard McGillin Tammy Sheila McCarthy
Toklas, Louis Bromfield, Artur Schnabel and Maria deacosta--offers a panoramic view of an era.
Modern Age, which published inexpensive original and reprint editions of works by Erskine Caldwell, Andre Gide, William Saroyan, and Ignazio Silone among others, then forwarded the manuscript to Wright and novelist Louis Bromfield for evaluation.
Malabar Farm, The Farm, and Pleasant Valley are all by Pulitzer Prize winning author Louis Bromfield.
Kains and Five Acres and Independence, and Louis Bromfield.
Louis Bromfield in his writings noted a far higher number of military inductees during WW II from the South than from the North were rejected for health reasons.
As explained by Louis Bromfield in Out of the Earth, "In sour soils the minerals and elements go into chemical combination with aluminum and iron, the chief elements of most soils, in which form they become locked up and unavailable to crops.
In several of his books, Louis Bromfield tells of restoring the stream which ran through Malabar Farm simply by cutting and planting a few willow cuttings on his evening walks during spring.
Louis Bromfield ran steers with his pastured pigs in order for them to have access to their fresh manure.
Apparently one way to get Louis Bromfield to start experimenting was to tell him whatever he was considering either couldn't be done or it just wouldn't work.