Napoleon

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Napoleon

 

(in French, napoléon d’or), a French gold coin worth 20 francs and containing 5.8 g of pure gold. Minted since 1803, the coin takes its name from the likenesses of Napoleon I and Napoleon III that it displays. Double napoleons (worth 40 francs), half napoleons (worth 10 francs), and quarter napoleons (worth 5 francs) have also been minted. Since the 1950’s, napoleons have been minted by the Bank of France for sale to private gold hoarders. [17–713 -1]

Napoleon

(1769–1821) vanquished most of Europe. [Fr. Hist.: Harvey, 570]
References in periodicals archive ?
Opinion polarised both in France and Britain; on the one hand Louis-Napoleon was declared a `saviour of society' and on the other the `Antichrist'.
The coup d'etat, then, indirectly brought a new government for Britain, and although it would survive for just ten months, on the whole it favoured Louis-Napoleon as he consolidated his position and prepared France for empire.
Louis-Napoleon, though, remained phlegmatic, having already ensured that his ambassador in Britain and foreign minister at home were either Anglophiles or at least committed to the entente cordiale, while his public speeches contained friendly overtures to Britain.
Il fut d'ailleurs moins scandalise par la repression sanglante de la revolution ouvriere de juin 1848 --il participa meme aux combats (Robb 273-78)--ou par les executions systematiques des Communards en 1871, que par le coup d'etat de Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte.
Il s'etait egalement oppose par principe a l'exclusion de Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte de la liste des candidats--une prise de position qu'il allait bientot regretter (Choses vues 11: 1093-96).
Le detail du fard et les operations qui s'y rattachent dans le recueil de Hugo--lavage, maquillage, deguisement, jeu de roles--destines a escamoter le crime fondateur, a en eliminer les traces, a obtenir la maitrise de la scene politique au moyen de la theatralite et du trompe-l'oeil, campent un Louis-Napoleon expert en l'art de manipuler les signes.
Histrion du crime" inapte a remplir son dernier mandat, tel est donc Louis-Napoleon lorsque, de retour dans ses quartiers de la Sous-Prefecture de Sedan, Delaherche le debusque a nouveau du regard: "l'oeil mort, voile des paupieres lourdes, disait la resignation du fataliste qui avait joue et perdu contre le destin la partie derniere" (668).
The lack of a clear plan, Cox argues, proved fatal because Louis-Napoleon procrastinated, ceding the initiative to von Moltke and pitching French mobilization into confusion.
17) Scott Carpenter, in his NCFS article "Of False Napoleons, and Other Political Prostheses: Writing Oppositionally from the Second Empire" details the "germanness" of Louis-Napoleon.
He begins with a rapid, "objective," but quite lively account of the events leading up to the coup d'etat, then shows the more or less covert attempts to justify or discredit both it and Louis-Napoleon contained in contemporary accounts written by members of the Prince-President's entourage and their opponents as well as in later standard historical summaries.
As does Louis-Napoleon himself: in order to become an effective leader, he had to "construct a public image [that] had to be one and indivisible.