Low German


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Low German

a language of N Germany, spoken esp in rural areas: more closely related to Dutch than to standard High German
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Even for those readers already familiar with the story of the Low German Mennonites, Village among Nations is sure to inform and delight.
maj (Wiklund 1915: 9, 15-16) or Low German loanword (Liin 1968: 304; SKES 339).
It is not always possible to determine if the word has been borrowed from Old Swedish, Swedish or even Low German (like in case of laadik 'casket', moon 'provisions', nunn 'nun', reede 'Friday').
This was the case of Low German (also called Sassisch and Platt), formerly a language in its own right more related to Dutch than to High German.
The government also pressed Mennonites to teach Russian in their schools, alongside High German, but left them free to speak Low German (a Northern German dialect with some Dutch influence) in the everyday (Thiessen 2003, x-xiii; Staliunas 2007).
The book begins with Mirfield's Anglian origins - the name derives from the Low German 'mear feld', meaning 'pleasant clearing' - and continues through the Middle Ages, through the industrial revolution to near the present day.
HEAD to the famous cannon tower Kiek in de K|k (low German for peep into the kitchen) for a guided tour of its bastion passages.
The first deals with the talc of the virginal marriage between Emperor Henry II and Cunegund as given in the Reykjaholabok, the early-sixteenth-century Icelandic legendary translated from Low German sources.
German Investor Confidence Fell to 19-Month Low German investor confidence fell more than economists' forecasts to a 19-month low in September as budget cuts across the Euro region and slowing global growth clouded the outlook for Europe's largest economy.
The volume begins with five articles on historical issues of diachronic linguistics, including consonantal sound changes in Old Low German, the multifuncitonality and polysemy of the verb kriegen in Low German, the emergent transition of Middle Low German into Dutch, and the morphological phenomenon Einheitsplural and the historical transition to contemporary Low Saxon.
In 1696, the present name Kiek in de Kok was also mentioned, meaning "peek into the kitchen" in Low German. And true enough, it was possible to watch what the enemy was doing in their "kitchen," i.e.
Her last words in Low German were: "Boys, if you can emigrate, then go, even if you have to leave everything behind" (247).