azoospermia

(redirected from Low sperm count)
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azoospermia

[¦ā‚zō·ō′spər·mē·ə]
(physiology)
Absence of motile sperm in the semen.
Failure of formation and development of sperm.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) Low sperm count: More than 90 per cent of male infertility cases result from low sperm count, which can be a direct result of an unhealthy diet, excessive intake of protein shakes, etc.
Prof Winston says IVF is appropriate when fallopian tubes are so badly damaged that tubal surgery has failed or can't be done, if a women isn't ovulating and ovulation-stimulating drugs have repeatedly failed, or if a man has an abnormal or low sperm count, but the sperm are still potentially capable of fertilising an egg.
We have had customers become pregnant with common male factor fertility issues such as low sperm count or motility issues; female partners on Clomid for ovulation; couples using ovulation monitors to track ovulation but wanting to optimize their monthly cycle; couples seeking out less-invasive treatment options; people using donor sperm; and those for whom ART options are unattainable.
These substances damages the sperm and causes low sperm count.
Test results revealed Thomas had a low sperm count and the couple would have to undergo IVF treatment in order to conceive.
What I can't tell them - because I promised my husband not to - is we wanted children, but can't have them naturally due to his low sperm count.
Research on men with low sperm count is now planned.
Low sperm count affects approximately 20% of young men in many European countries (Jorgensen et al.
While it can make conception difficult Dr Lewis-Jones em phasises that having a low sperm count does not automatically rule out the chances of having a natural pregnancy.
During the study, when fascial interposition was used with ligation and excision, about 93 percent of men had reached a low sperm count (less than 100,000 sperm per milliliter of semen) by 22 weeks after surgery compared to 81 percent of men without fascial interposition.
A HAVING a low sperm count does not necessarily lead to infertility.
A 31-year-old woman gave birth to a baby girl last weekend using a tiny amount of spermatozoa taken from her husband, who suffers from a male chromosomal disorder that usually results in sterility or extremely low sperm count, thus preventing fertilization, a gynecologist said Thursday.