Lowell, John

Lowell, John,

1743–1802, American jurist, b. Newburyport, Mass. He became (1762) a lawyer and later served in the provincial assembly (1776, 1778), in the state constitutional convention (1779–80), and in the Continental Congress (1782–83). Lowell was a member (1784) of the commission that settled the New York–Massachusetts boundary dispute, and after 1789 he held several major judicial posts. He was a founder of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the father of Francis Cabot Lowell and John Lowell (1769–1840).

Lowell, John,

1769–1840, American political writer, b. Newburyport, Mass.; son of John Lowell (1743–1802). He practiced law, but devoted most of his time to supporting his Federalist views in newspapers and pamphlets. Mr. Madison's War (1812) was his most effective piece of writing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heinz, Henry Clay Frick, Thomas Edison, John Rockefeller, James O'Hara, Issac Craig, Francis Cabot Lowell, John Crozer, Peter Cooper, Joseph Banigan, John Wanamaker, Philip Armour, George Pullman, Oliver Sheldon, and Joseph Wharton, and their varying levels of philanthropy and paternalism, along with discussion of government policy, unions, and the New Deal.
After an opening section on "the critical legacy," Beck devotes Part 2 to poets (Jarrell, Lowell, John Berryman), Part 3 to fiction-writing contemporaries (Andrew Lyre, Caroline Gordon, Katherine Anne Porter), and Part 4 to fiction-writing proteges (Eudora Welty, Peter Taylor, and Flannery O'Connor).
They deal with four poets - Robert Lowell, John Berryman, Rita Dove, and Jorie Graham - who have grappled in their poetry with the "given" of their personal history and have gone on to remake that material in significant ways.
Her topic is how four recent American poets--Robert Lowell, John Berryman, Rita Dove and, once again, Jorie Graham--transform the determining facts of their lives into poetry, and so "[make] out of the problematic, the aesthetic.