Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Address:c/o Santa Ana NWR
Rt 2, Box 202A
Alamo, TX 78516

Phone:956-784-7500
Fax:956-787-8338
Web: southwest.fws.gov/refuges/texas/lrgv.html
Established: 1979.
Location:7 miles south of Alamo, Texas.
Facilities:Visitor center (at Santa Ana NWR).
Activities:Canoeing, hiking hunting, fishing, birdwatching.
Special Features:Not only do the Central and Mississippi flyways converge here at the southern tip of Texas, but the area is also the northernmost range for many bird species. Considered one of the most biologically diverse NWRs in the continental United States, the site represents 11 distinct biotic communities that are host or home to 1,100 types of plants, 700 vertebrate species (including 484 bird species), and more than 300 species of butterflies.
Habitats: 90,000 acres of coastal barrier islands, resacas (oxbow lakes), desert-like brushlands, riverside woodlands, and caliche hillsides. Still in an acquisition phase, the refuge will eventually encompass 132,500 acres.
Access: Portions of the refuge are open year round, from sunrise to sunset to foot traffic only.
Wild life: Two endangered cats: the ocelot and jaguarundi. Also provides habitat for speckled racer, plain chachalaca, green jay, great kiskadee, southern yellow bat, Kemp's Ridley turtle, white-tailed deer, and collared peccary.

See other parks in Texas.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Center for Biological Diversity, a nonprofit advocacy group, said the proposed blueprint for the project indicates the barrier would cut through the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, National Butterfly Center, Bentsen-Rio Grande State Park, and the grounds of the historic La Lomita Chapel, as well as hundreds of family farms and other private property.
(1) Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge 3325 Green Jay Rd., Alamo, Texas 78516
THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY National Wildlife Refuge in southern Texas provides habitat for more than 40 percent of all North American butterfly species, 500 species of bird and 1,200 plant species, along with 18 federally listed threatened or endangered species.
The Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge and TNC have established their own native plant nurseries that grow up to 45 species and more than 150,000 seedlings per year.
Since the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge was specifically created to allow the endangered ocelot and other species to migrate across the border, it is unlikely that the refuge will be able to approve the fence, said Nancy Brown, with the South Texas Refuge Complex, which includes the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge.
They occur on Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge property, private property, and highway rights-of-way.
The Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is working to prevent further degradation of the ecosystem and to create a corridor for wildlife by connecting the various ecosystem fragments.
* Continue reforestation of Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Texas, considered one of the continental U.S.'s most biologically diverse national wildlife refuges (see South Texas Eco-Wonderland, Winter 2004).
Winter for assistance with literature searches and to the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge for providing funding through the AmeriCorps program, a vehicle, and support for the author.
This progress includes: 1) establishing conservation agreements between at least 10 private landowners and the Texas Parks and wildlife Department; 2) acquiring Johnston's frankenia habitat for inclusion in the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge; 3) monitoring the status of Johnston's frankenia populations since 1993; 4) studying the species' habitat requirements, life history and population biology; 5) conducting surveys to find additional populations; and 6) launching a public outreach campaign about the species to establish good working relationships with private land owners.
Packaging giant Tetra Pak has donated $9,800 to AMERICAN FORESTS' effort to regreen the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Tetra Pak made the donation to AMERICAN FORESTS' Global ReLeaf Forests program to offset the environmental effects of its corporate air travel.
A closer look at those brush patches reveals small blue goose signs that identify the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge (NWR).

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