Lubitsch, Ernst


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Lubitsch, Ernst

(lo͞o`bĭch), 1892–1947, German-American film director, b. Berlin. He studied acting in his native city and in 1911 joined Max ReinhardtReinhardt, Max,
1873–1943, Austrian theatrical producer and director, originally named Max Goldmann. After acting under Otto Brahm at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, he managed (1902–5) his own theater, where he produced more than 50 plays.
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's theatre company. Lubitsch turned to directing in 1914 and became known for such silent films as the drama Madame Du Barry (Passion) and the comedy Die Puppe (The Doll), both released in 1919. Lubitsch made more than 40 German films before he was invited to the United States to direct Mary PickfordPickford, Mary,
1893–1979, American movie actress, b. Toronto, Ont. In 1909 she began working with D. W. Griffith. Specializing in playing young girls, she was dubbed "America's Sweetheart.
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 in Rosita (1923). He became a Hollywood favorite, making Lady Windermere's Fan (1925), The Patriot (1928), and other silents. With the advent of sound, he directed a string of sparkling, sophisticated, and sexually knowing comedies marked by a lightness, urbanity, and grace that critics dubbed "the Lubitsch touch." These include Trouble in Paradise (1932), Design for Living (1933), Ninotchka (1939), The Shop around the Corner (1940), To Be or Not to Be (1942), and Heaven Can Wait (1943). Lubitsch died while filming That Lady in Ermine (1948).

Lubitsch, Ernst

(1892–1947) movie director; born in Berlin, Germany. He began directing movies in Germany in 1914, and was brought to Hollywood by Mary Pickford. A specialist in sophisticated comedies and costume epics, his films include Ninotchka (1939) and Heaven Can Wait (1943).