Lucilius


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Lucilius

Gaius . ?180--102 bc, Roman satirist, regarded as the originator of poetical satire
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
example, Seneca, in another letter to Lucilius, wrote of happiness,
The Letters, composed during the three years before Nero ordered Seneca to commit suicide, is, as the translators point out, Seneca's "most significant philosophical contribution" and "his most innovative venture in literary composition." Though each letter is addressed to Lucilius, Seneca notes early on "the work that I am doing is for posterity ...
Seneca's Moral Letters to Lucilius (first century AD).
Here Horace writes of his predecessor in the satiric genre, Lucilius, "Ille velut fidis arcana sodalibus olim / Credebat libris, neque si male cesserat, usquam / decurrens alio, neque si bene; quo fit ut omnis / votiva pateat veluti descripta tabella / vita senis.
It is in fact not uncommon for other Horatian poems to account for their generic position by citing a predecessor in the field: so Satire 1.4 alludes to the tradition in which it might be placed by presenting the satirist Lucilius and the writers of Old Comedy, 'on whom he relied entirely':
The previous two were Feller & Gotting's 1966 Northwestern article, stating that the Second Amendment is only for the National Guard, see Feller & Gotting, supra note 144; and a 1915 Harvard piece from retired Maine Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Lucilius Emery, arguing that the Second Amendment is for the entire militia, but only for them, and therefore the Amendment poses no barrier to disarming women, children, the elderly, or the disabled, see Lucilius A.
Seneca's fictional moral philosophical letters to Lucilius depicted reading and writing as forms of violence with potent contemporary political valency; to be influenced by this epistolary style was to develop a combative understanding of literature.
$19.00) by Josiah Osgood: "A Lucau Reader: Selections from Civil War" (97S0S65166615, S19.00) by Susanna Braund: and "A Roman Verse Satire Reader: Selections from Lucilius. Horace, Persius.
Lucilius' sarcastic advice to a pantomime-dancer that he should have died like the character he had been portraying in his dancing (AP 11,254) is set side by side with the "actor" dying for real in the Laureolus mime; on p.
(13) In the first three books, Epicurus is cited in the form of aphorisms for Lucilius to digest.