Lucius Accius


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Accius, Lucius

 

Born 170 B.C. in Umbria; died sometime after 90 B.C. in Rome (?). Roman dramatist and philologist.

Accius was the author of more than 40 tragedies with subjects taken from Greek mythology and two other tragedies whose themes are taken from Roman history. At the same time, Accius reflected the political situation of his age and condemned tyranny. His tragedy Brutus was directed against Scipio the Younger. His works are written in a rhetorical style, with much pathos. Only fragments, amounting to about 700 lines, remain of Accius’ works.

WORKS

[Fragments], in Scaenicorum Romanorum fragmenta. Vol. 1: Tragicorum fragmenta. Edited by A. Klotz. Munich, 1953.

REFERENCE

Istoriia rimskoi literatury, vol. 1. Moscow, 1959.
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Schubert, John Keats, Hannah Arendt, Martin Heidegger, or "the great poet who dies in our country" for choosing a quote from the play Atreus by Roman author Lucius Accius, the writing stages and rough drafts of the poems, the notes that gave birth to music by Rachmaninov, a performance recorded at Milan's La Scala, even the rationale for choosing to reproduce fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls found at Khirbet Qumran on the book's cover.
The greatest Roman tragic dramatist before Lucius Accius.
Schubert, John Keats, Hannah Arendt, Martin Heidegger, or the "great poet who dies in our country," for choosing a quote from the play Atreus by the Roman author Lucius Accius, the writing stages and rough drafts of the poems, the notes by Rachmaninov that gave it music, a performance recorded at Milan's La Scala, even the rationale for choosing to reproduce on the book jacket fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls found at Khirbet Qumran.