Lucius III

Lucius III,

d. 1185, pope (1181–85), a native of Lucca named Ubaldo Allucingoli; successor of Alexander III. He was a Cistercian with St. Bernard and was created a cardinal in 1141 by Innocent II. He was a successful diplomat under Alexander, notably in the peace negotiations (1177) with Roman Emperor Frederick I. During his reign his relations with Frederick were cool; Lucius refused to crown Henry VI, Frederick's son, and there was the perennial question of the lands of MatildaMatilda,
1046–1115, countess of Tuscany, called the Great Countess; supporter of Pope Gregory VII in the papal conflict with the Holy Roman emperors. Ruling over Tuscany and parts of Emilia-Romagna and Umbria, she controlled the most powerful feudal state in central Italy.
..... Click the link for more information.
, countess of Tuscany. The pope and the emperor had a long conference at Verona in 1184 and there issued a joint decree (Ad abolendam) on the extirpation of heresies. The decree had a new stringency and detail, but death was not yet invoked as a penalty. The Waldensians were condemned at the same meeting. Lucius was succeeded by Urban III.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in periodicals archive ?
There's even a Pope (Lucius III, 1181-85) buried in the choir stalls.
Pope Lucius III, at the Council of Verona in 1184, anathemized them together with doctrinal heretics as well as the humiliati and Patarenes.
Because the Poor, both male and female, became itinerant preachers of penance in opposition to a prohibition of the archbishop of Lyon, Pope Lucius III in 1184 condemned them as schismatics.

Full browser ?