Luddite


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Luddite

English history
any of the textile workers opposed to mechanization who rioted and organized machine-breaking between 1811 and 1816
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Luddite

An individual who is against technological change. Luddite comes from Englishman Ned Lud, who rose up against his employer in the late 1700s. Subsequently, "Luddites" emerged in other companies to protest and even destroy new machinery that would put them out of a job. A neo-Luddite is a Luddite in the Internet age.

Luddite vs. Technophobe
A Luddite is anti-technology because of personal principles, whereas a technophobe is afraid of computers and high-tech gadgets.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Created by James Yeatman and Lauren Mooney, the production takes audiences back to the height of the Industrial Revolution, Back in the early 1800s, however, being cal led a Luddite wasn't just a social crime - it was a hugely serious crime that could lead to the death penalty.
"When I first heard this, I had a moment of panic only because, whilst it's unfair in his absence to call the leader a Luddite, he's not the most capable when it comes to digital matters."
The Luddites of the 1800s were unsuccessful for (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/what-the-luddites-really-fought-against-264412/) a number of reasons : They were politically marginal.
The Luddites were 19thcentury weavers and textile workers who protested against new technologies that could end their trade.
Here is a compendium of items from the communications world: Podcast One signs a legend; Luddites inhabit the Senate; GateAir is set to meet at NAB; Nielsen partners with Concentric; Q2 employment plans are solid per CareerBuilder; and in another sign of economic recovery, the Tooth Fairy had a big 2014.
His assertion that those of us who are critical of the monstrous building disfiguring the banks of the River Tees adjacent to the Victoria Bridge are Luddites demonstrates a profound ignorance of both the people of Stockton and the Luddites.
NED LUDD was the mythical leader of the Luddites, the social movement of English textile workers, formed in 1811, that resisted the onward march of the industrial revolution.
This very welcome book provides an introduction to Midlands, Northwestern, and Yorkshire Luddism, together with transcripts of Luddite documents from each of those areas, listed by date, with commentary.
Importantly, comedic and whimsical elements prevent such works from descending into wild-eyed Luddite rants.
But I'm going to make the Luddite suggestion that it may just be that the newsletter industry is in danger of getting the technological cart in front of the subscriber's horse.
Lest I sound like a modern-age Luddite, I invite your submission electronically via our Manuscript Central site.
The Luddite riots that began in 1811 in England spread to Yorkshire, Lancashire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire as wheat prices soar and inflate the price of bread.