Luddite


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Luddite

English history
any of the textile workers opposed to mechanization who rioted and organized machine-breaking between 1811 and 1816

Luddite

An individual who is against technological change. Luddite comes from Englishman Ned Lud, who rose up against his employer in the late 1700s. Subsequently, "Luddites" emerged in other companies to protest and even destroy new machinery that would put them out of a job. A neo-Luddite is a Luddite in the Internet age.

Luddite vs. Technophobe
A Luddite is anti-technology because of personal principles, whereas a technophobe is afraid of computers and high-tech gadgets.
References in periodicals archive ?
A group between the luddites and the utopians, the 'beneficial AI movement which contends that AI is likely to arrive sometime in the next hundred years and that we better get to work on making sure that its effects are benign and not malignant.
The Luddites of the 1800s were unsuccessful for (https://www.
Prayers were also said for the forthcoming Luddite Way Business Park to become a valuable place for employment and enterprise.
The Luddites were 19thcentury weavers and textile workers who protested against new technologies that could end their trade.
His assertion that those of us who are critical of the monstrous building disfiguring the banks of the River Tees adjacent to the Victoria Bridge are Luddites demonstrates a profound ignorance of both the people of Stockton and the Luddites.
NED LUDD was the mythical leader of the Luddites, the social movement of English textile workers, formed in 1811, that resisted the onward march of the industrial revolution.
In the Romantic context, retrospective and prospective issues weave their own tragedy in Luddite writings: on the one hand they survive as record of the rich otherness of languages formed by class and locality; on the other they initiate the task set before working-class leaders: of out-arguing the governing class in its own language.
And now, for all of you Luddites, the JOURNAL OF FAMILY PRACTICE is undergoing a technology revolution of its own: the move to fully electronic, web-based submission and review of manuscripts.
The Luddite riots that began in 1811 in England spread to Yorkshire, Lancashire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire as wheat prices soar and inflate the price of bread.
Terrified of being dismissed as a Luddite, I am certainly not suggesting that all or even most nanotechnology public offerings will end in disaster (though, as The Wall Street Journal recently pointed out, the record for biotechnology startups dating back to the 1980s is not particularly good).
Someone who throws away his cell phone, blows up his computer and "zeroes his data" (eliminating all of his electronic transaction histories) is the perfect example of the modern Luddite.
Arkfeld walks readers through lists and explanations of basic computer storage devices that are likely to be very familiar to most readers of this review; judicial definitions of computer concepts that may strike the experienced reader as elementary are quoted, all for the purpose of bringing Luddite lawyers up to speed on IT concepts.