Ludus Coventriae

Ludus Coventriae

(lo͞o`dəs kəvĕn`trēā), one of four extant cycles of English miracle plays. In the 17th cent. it was mistakenly designated as originating in the town of Coventry. Because of its stylistic distinction from other Coventry plays, the Ludus Coventriae is presently believed to have been produced by a traveling troupe. See also miracle playmiracle play
or mystery play,
form of medieval drama that came from dramatization of the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church. It developed from the 10th to the 16th cent., reaching its height in the 15th cent.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the Towneley Cycle, Pharoah's title character exhorts "heyf vp youre hertis vnto mahowne / he will be nere vs in oure need" (413-44; the lines appear almost identically in the York Exodus, 404-5); Pilate and Roman soldiers and torturers invoke "mahowne" in The Conspiracy six times (11, 12, 116-17, 124-25, 156-57,645-46) and in The Scourging five times (3, 39, 239, 394, 413); they continue to do so in The Crucifixion, The Talents, The Resurrection of the Lord, (6) and also in the York Arrest of Christ and Second Accusation before Pilate; Romans also invoke Mohammed in the Ludus Coventriae Guarding of the Sepulchre.
Inspiration behind the text from the Ludus Coventriae - the famous Coventry Mystery Plays which some believe inspired the "Mechanical's play" within Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream.
Jacobs's book then moves rather quickly through the cycle plays, exploring the medieval manifestations of the modern sociological phenomenon of the "trailing spouse)' Noah's wife in the Chester and York (but not Wakefield) plays suffers from this condition as does Joseph in plays from the York cycle and the Ludus Coventriae. She then turns her attention to the plays of the "renaissance stage"
(7) James Orchard Halliwell, Ludus Coventriae. A Collection of Mysteries, Shakespeare Society (London, 1841), x.
David Morley's Ludus Coventriae fuses Coventry's famed Mystery Plays, the medieval Coventry Carols and 20th-century history to produce a poem that depicts the lives of city inhabitants over past centuries.
(2) See especialy Kolve, 104-6, and Lynn Squires, "Law and Disorder in the Ludus Coventriae," Comparative Drama 12 (1978): 205 ff.
There is here a disturbing lack of familiarity with modern scholarship: why 'Ludus Coventriae' still, and why J.
neighebor (c) `fellow man, fellow Christian' also notes a figurative sense `dear one' from a passage in The Assumption of the Virgin in the so-called Ludus Coventriae or N-Town Plays,(1) where, after the stage direction `hic vadit anima in corpus marie', the Lord addresses the soul of Mary with the following words:
David Morley, who directs the writing programme at University of Warwick, this week launched Ludus Coventriae - a long poem which depicts the lives of city people over several centuries.
(1) Joseph Allen Bryant Jr., "The Function of Ludus Coventriae 14," Journal of English and Germanic Philology 52 (1953): 341.
The editors' decision to exclude the fifteenth century (though the York Crucifixion may be as late as that) perpetuates a skewed impression of the tradition and entails the absence of any of the late bravura passages from the so-called Ludus Coventriae and, more regrettably still, of anything at all by the Wakefield Master.
These are not the original Coventry plays as they are lost; the text called the Ludus Coventriae, once thought to belong to the Coventry cycle, is now thought to have probably originated in the north.