Luggnagg

Luggnagg

imaginary island; inhabitants immortal but lack immortal health. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
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References in classic literature ?
The continent, of which this kingdom is apart, extends itself, as I have reason to believe, eastward, to that unknown tract of America westward of California; and north, to the Pacific Ocean, which is not above a hundred and fifty miles from Lagado; where there is a good port, and much commerce with the great island of Luggnagg, situated to the north-west about 29 degrees north latitude, and 140 longitude.
When I arrived at the port of Maldonada (for so it is called) there was no ship in the harbour bound for Luggnagg, nor likely to be in some time.
Ever since Jonathan Swift's Gulliver travelled to the nation of Luggnagg, where the "struldbrugs" age but never die, writers have used the notion of immortality to examine the possibilities and limits of a human life.
Part III of which novel is entitled A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg and Glubbdubdrib?
Also easily contrasted to Exams of Merit is the simple procedure of applying poison to the dust of the throne room in Luggnagg (175).
At the end of the Third Voyage, when Gulliver sails from Luggnagg to Japan, where he hopes he can get a ship back to Europe, he poses as a Dutchman because he knows the Dutch are the only Europeans permitted to enter Japan.(7) He invents a personal history for himself, pretending that his parents are 'obscure People in the Province of Guelderland'.(8) When he appears before the Emperor of Japan with a 'Letter of Recommendation' from the Emperor of Luggnagg, he asks to be excused from performing the ceremony of trampling on the crucifix.