Lycia

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Lycia

Lycia (lĭshˈə), ancient country, SW Asia Minor. Egyptian sources ally the Lycians to the Hittites at the time of Ramses II; the Lycians spoke an Anatolian language. Lycia was frequently mentioned by Homer in Greek mythology. In historic times it was held by the Persians, the Seleucids, and the Romans (from 189 B.C.). Its chief towns included Xanthus, Patara, and Myra. Ruins include many rock-cut Lycian tombs and later Grecian sculptures dating from the 5th cent. B.C.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lycia

 

in antiquity, a country in southern Asia Minor. The Lycians settled the area in the first millennium B.C. Before their assimilation by the Greeks in the third century B.C., they spoke one of the Hittite-Luwian languages and used a written alphabet in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. From the middle of the sixth century B.C. Lycia was under Persian rule, although the Lycian king Pericles ruled in the eastern part of the country in the fourth century. At the end of the fourth century, Lycia became part of the empire of Alexander the Great. From 295 to 197, the country was ruled by the Ptolemies. In the first century B.C., Lycia came under the Roman rule as an autonomous state. In a.d. 43 a Roman province was formed on the territory of Lycia and Pamphylia.

REFERENCES

Neumann, G. “Lykisch.” In Handbuch der Orientalistik, vol. 2, part 2. Leiden, 1969.
Treuber, O. Geschichte der Lykier. Stuttgart, 1887.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lycia

an ancient region on the coast of SW Asia Minor: a Persian, Rhodian, and Roman province
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005