Lumbricus


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

Lumbricus

[′ləm·brə·kəs]
(invertebrate zoology)
A genus of earthworms recognized as the type genus of the family Lumbricidae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a number is valid for as large earthworms as Lumbricus terrestris, which has, on average, 134.7 segments and 0.8 mm long chaetae (Wroot 1985), while the average wet weight is 2700-3000 mg (Carley 1978).
Based on the above explanation, the researchers aimed at determining the effect of earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus) extract in decreasing ALT, AST, and invivo inhibition of S.typhimurium colonies.
Kille, "Differential metallothionein expression in earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus) tissues," Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol.
Carbon and trace element fluxes in the pore water of an urban soil following greenwaste compost, woody and biochar amendments, inoculated with the earthworm Lumbricus terrestres, Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43: 188-196.
053 BIOMASS EFFECTS OF ROUNDUP PRO[R] ON ANECIC EARTHWORM LUMBRICUS TERRESTRIS: REPEATED LOW-DOSE APPLICATION IN A MICROCOSM SETTING.
Those earthworms most suited for nutrition studies are Lumbricus rubellus and Eisenia foetida, the com--mon red worms used for fishing.
Dave - lumbricus terrestris, to give his full Latin name - was discovered by gardener Paul Rees in his vegetable patch.
Paul Rees, from Widnes, spotted the monster Lumbricus terrestris in his vegetable patch.
The common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) is known by a variety of names, but nightcrawler is most often used in North America.