Luminous Energy


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Luminous energy

The radiant energy in the visible region or quantity of light. It is in the form of electromagnetic waves, and since the visible region is commonly taken as extending 380–760 nanometers in wavelength, the luminous energy is contained within that region. It is equal to the time integral of the production of the luminous flux. See Photometry

Luminous Energy

 

radiant energy that can be detected by the human eye or by other optical detectors whose spectral sensitivity is equal to that of the average eye. The term “luminous energy” is also used in the sense of quantity of light. In this sense it is equal to the product of the luminous flux and the time in which the flux is radiated or received. The unit of luminous energy is the lumen-second.

luminous energy

[′lü·mə·nəs ′en·ər·jē]
(optics)
The total radiant energy emitted by a source, evaluated according to its capacity to produce visual sensation; measured in lumen-hours or lumen-seconds.

luminous energy

The time integral of luminous flux; given by the product of the luminous flux and the time that the flux is maintained, if the luminous flux is of constant value; usually expressed in lumen-hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
The antenna subunits absorb the luminous energy and gets excited, and then transfers the energy to RC pigments for original photochemical reaction.
When pigments are excited by luminous energy, the excition is generated after electrons return to the former orbits, and then excites the neighboring pigment molecules, to complete a process of energy transfer.
However, the approach by which the antenna pigments transfer the luminous energy to RC complex is still undetermined and disputed (Holzenburg et al.
Luminous Energy is also seeking to build a solar park at Boduan near Pwllheli to provide energy for 2,800 homes.
The luminous energy introduced an aspect of fragility and impalpability and not only created a crisis for the primary object (sometimes bottles as well as various fabric items) but also altered the way colors and forms were read.