Lungshan

Lungshan

 

a Neolithic culture of the first half of the second millennium B.C. in northern China. Replacing the Yangshao culture, the Lungshan culture initially encompassed the middle Huang Ho basin and subsequently spread eastward into what is now Shantung Province. It is characterized by thin gray and black glazed and unglazed pottery, some of which was made on the potter’s wheel; by fine, polished stone implements; by articles made of bone and shells; and by the practice of scapulomancy. With the Lungshan culture, new types of pottery, for example, the li vessel with three udder-shaped, hollow feet, appeared in China for the first time, as well as new species of grains (wheat, barley) and domestic animals (ox, goat, sheep). The bearers of the culture lived in a communal-clan system. The Lungshan culture was replaced by the Bronze Age Shang Yin culture in about the 16th century B.C.

REFERENCE

Kriukov, M. V. “U istokov drevnikh kul’tur Vostochnoi Azii.” Narody Azii i Afriki, 1964, no. 6.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sethi has a long- list of places you must visit when in Taipei: the Lungshan Temple, which was built by the Ching dynasty, devoted to Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy; the blue pagoda- roofed Chiang Kai- shek Memorial, built in the memory of the first Chinese president; and the Taipei 101 tower, one of the tallest buildings in the city, towering 509.
Among the vessels, the presence of the li pottery is noteworthy: while ceramics in themselves are rare at Northern sites, the clay li is a humble piece usually found at Neolithic sites in the Lungshan period, at proto-Zhou sites in the western provinces, and at outlying sites such as Zhukaigou (Tian & Guo 1988).
The idea of municipal marketing, which has been put into practice by many cities in the world, is now catching on at the Taipei City Government, which is seeking to sell a variety of gift, souvenir and stationery items featuring the various Taipei landmarks, such as Taipei 101 and Lungshan Temple.