Lungshan

Lungshan

 

a Neolithic culture of the first half of the second millennium B.C. in northern China. Replacing the Yangshao culture, the Lungshan culture initially encompassed the middle Huang Ho basin and subsequently spread eastward into what is now Shantung Province. It is characterized by thin gray and black glazed and unglazed pottery, some of which was made on the potter’s wheel; by fine, polished stone implements; by articles made of bone and shells; and by the practice of scapulomancy. With the Lungshan culture, new types of pottery, for example, the li vessel with three udder-shaped, hollow feet, appeared in China for the first time, as well as new species of grains (wheat, barley) and domestic animals (ox, goat, sheep). The bearers of the culture lived in a communal-clan system. The Lungshan culture was replaced by the Bronze Age Shang Yin culture in about the 16th century B.C.

REFERENCE

Kriukov, M. V. “U istokov drevnikh kul’tur Vostochnoi Azii.” Narody Azii i Afriki, 1964, no. 6.
References in periodicals archive ?
Popular attractions include Lungshan Temple, Glass Matsu Temple and Nine Turns Lane.
This is evident not only in the intricate architectural and ornamental details of structures like Lungshan Temple, but the town's continued status as a bastion of time-honored arts and crafts.
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The oldest and most popular temple for visitors to the capital city is unquestionably Lungshan Temple.
There are many temples to visit in Taipei; the most notable is the historic, 250-yearold Lungshan Temple.
Lungshan Szu (Dragon Mountain Temple) is the oldest and most famous Buddhist temple in Taipei.
The town is full of temples, though the most visited are Lungshan and Matsu.
On February 20, 1996, during a lunar new year visit to the popular Lungshan Buddhist temple in downtown Taipei, Lee Teng-hui brought his campaign message, "Sovereignty rests with the people," to an overflow crowd.
The district is home to the newly-named national monument Lungshan Temple, historic Red House Theater, and Ximending shopping district.
"We should not always tell foreigners to visit Lungshan Temple; they can go for a hike to the mountains, too,'he said.