Lunokhod

Lunokhod

(loo -nŏ-kod, -hod) An eight-wheeled Soviet robotic lunar roving vehicle, soft-landed on the Moon by Lunas 17 and 21. Lunokhod 1 was equipped with a laser reflector for lunar-ranging experiments; it was active in Mare Imbrium for 10 months during which time it completed a 10-km traverse, performing photographic tasks, magnetic field measurements, and chemical (X-ray) and cosmic-ray analyses. Lunokhod 2 traveled 37 km in four months in the vicinity of Le Monnier crater on the borders of Mare Serenitatis. See also Lunar Roving Vehicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Always in Matera, the ASI laser ray MLRO (Matera Laser Ranging Observatory) periodically reaches the lunar soil where some retro-reflectors have been installed during past Apollo and Soviet robotic Lunokhod missions.
The program has had an extraordinary record of success: 28.1 miles (45.2 kilometers) traversed, more than the Soviet Union's Lunokhod 2 moon rover during the 1970s and more than the rover that US astronauts took to the moon on the Apollo 17 mission in 1972.
This concept has been applied to the lunar rover Lunokhod [10].
Lunokhod "Robot-Geologist": scientific tasks and technical configuration, Proceedings of 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, March 20-24, 2017, Houston, USA, Available from: http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2017/pdf/1929.pdf Accessed on: 2017-03-09
Then, the Soviet Union launched the remote lunar exploration robot Lunokhod No.1 and No.2.
[20] compared the photographs taken by the Lunokhod and Yutu rovers, which indicated that there exist rock blocks with diameters of dozens of centimeters across the lunar surface.
For LLR experiments, retroreflectors were installed on the Moon during the Apollo program (11, 14, and 15) and the two Lunokhod missions of the Soviet Union [20].
Such people are the intended audience of this lengthy but compelling story of the mostly unmanned exploration of the inner solar system, including missions to Mars (Viking), the Moon (Luna, Lunokhod), Venus (Venera), and Halley's Comet (Vega), among others.
In its mission, it surpassed former Soviet Union's Lunokhod 1 in 1970, which managed 322 days.
Discussion encompasses the Mars Viking missions and craft such as Venera Venus Lander, Phobos, Vega I, Luna 20, and Lunokhod I.
"Secondly, we must ensure survival during lunar nights, which back then was only achieved only by our 'Lunokhod' rover."
The previous record was held by the Soviet Union's Lunokhod 2 rover.