Lusatia


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Lusatia

(lo͞osā`shə), Ger. Lausitz, Pol. Łużyce, region of E Germany and SW Poland. It extends N from the Lusatian Mts., at the Czech border, and W from the Oder River. The hilly and fertile southern section is known as Upper Lusatia, the sandy and forested northern part as Lower Lusatia. The Lusatian Neisse separates E Germany and SW Poland. Forestry, farming, and stock raising are the chief occupations. There are lignite mines, textile mills, and glass-making factories. Bautzen, Cottbus, Görlitz, Żagań, and Zittau are the main towns.

The Lusatians are descended from the Slavic WendsWends
or Sorbs,
Slavic people (numbering about 60,000) of Brandenburg and Saxony, E Germany, in Lusatia. They speak Lusatian (also known as Sorbic or Wendish), a West Slavic language with two main dialects: Upper Lusatian, nearer to Czech, and Lower Lusatian, nearer to
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, and part of the population, particularly in the Spree Forest, still speaks Wendish and has preserved traditional dress and customs. The region was colonized by the Germans beginning in the 10th cent. and was constituted into the margraviates of Upper and Lower Lusatia. Both margraviates changed hands frequently among Saxony, Bohemia, and Brandenburg. In 1346 several towns of the region formed the Lusatian League and preserved considerable independence. Under the Treaty of Prague (1635) all of Lusatia passed to Saxony. The Congress of Vienna awarded (1815) Lower Lusatia and a large part of Upper Lusatia to Prussia. After World War II the Lusatian Wends (or Sorbs, as they are also called) sought unsuccessfully to obtain national recognition.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lusatia

 

(Sorbian, Łuzica; German, Lausitz), a historical geographic region between the Elbe and Oder rivers, in what is now the southeastern German Democratic Republic (GDR).

The region is divided into Lower Lusatia (Dolnja Łuzica, Niederlausitz) in the north and Upper Lusatia (Hornja Łuzica, Oberlausitz) in the south; this division appeared in the 15th century, up until which time only Lower Lusatia was known as Lusatia. In the first millennium A.D., the territory was inhabited by Polabian Slavs—the Wends in the north and the Milzani in the south (the Milzani were centered mainly in Baudissin, now Bautzen, and this territory was originally called Baudissin Land); these tribes became the basis for consolidation of the Lusatian (Wendish) feudal nationality.

In the tenth century Lusatia was seized by German feudal lords, and the Lusatian, or Eastern, March (later margravate) was created in the territory of Lower Lusatia. In the 11th to 14th centuries Upper and Lower Lusatia belonged at different times to the margraves of Meissen, Poland, Bohemia, and Brandenburg; in 1320, Upper Lusatia, and in 1373, Lower Lusatia, became part of the Czech lands and together with them became in 1526 part of the Hapsburg monarchy. In 1635, Upper and Lower Lusatia became a possession of the Saxon electors, and in 1815 they were divided between Prussia (all of Lower and part of Upper Lusatia with the city of Görlitz) and Saxony (part of Upper Lusatia and the city of Bautzen). The region was colonized by the Germans; its Slavic population was partially Germanized and partially retained its language, customs, and culture. As part of the GDR, Lower Lusatia and a smaller part of Upper Lusatia are in Cottbus District, and most of Upper Lusatia is in Dresden District.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lusatia

a region of central Europe, lying between the upper reaches of the Elbe and Oder Rivers: now mostly in E Germany, extending into SW Poland; inhabited chiefly by Sorbs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1597, he obtained the position of cantor in Zittau (Zitava) in Lusatia, which he left after seven years to Freiberg in Saxony, which we know from a municipal record from the 27th of April 1604.
Through direct work with native speakers, Glaser (Open U.) examines these issues as they arise amongst Gaelic speakers in Scotland and the Sorbs of Lusatia in Germany.
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Lusatia, Bohemia, Helvetia, Dania (UPS) (Lectotipo designado por Haesler, 1982).
He wrote poetry during three periods in the United States, often filled with longing for his native Lusatia and a desire to go home there, and also to heaven.
Ferdinand transferred important Habsburg territories--respectively, Lusatia and Upper Austria--to their temporary ownership since he could not meet his obligations to them immediately (and would not for a long time to come; in fact, Lusatia was eventually transferred to Saxony for good).
From Dresden we returned again here, with Bigge who has finished his tour to Venice, and according to promise comes to spend a few days in Lusatia before going home.
The lignite produced by the group's seven opencast mines in the Rhineland and Lusatia accounts for approximately a quarter of the fuel requirements of Germany's electrical power generation industry.
22, 1729, Kamenz, Upper Lusatia, Saxony [Germany]--d.
The small royal town was located on a major trade route, leading from Prague to Saxony and Upper Lusatia. Baptised as Jan Antonin, from 1773 at the latest he used the name Leopold, so as to distinguish himself from his elder cousin Jan Evangelista Antonin Kozeluh (1738-1814), who was also a musician.