Lusitanian


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Lusitanian

[‚lü·sə′tan·ē·ən]
(geology)
Lower Jurassic geologic time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Variability in the mating calls of the Lusitanian toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus: cues for potential individual recognition.
Discoveries, the bravery and courage of the Lusitanian people, during his time, is the theme of the Luis Vaz de Camoes poems.
This fact is a quite common feature as indicated by several works concerning the Lower Jurassic of the Cleveland Basin in the UK (van Buchem et al., 1992) and in the Lusitanian Basin of Portugal (Correia et al, 2012).
(5) Eduardo Lourenco admits, of course, the importance of the language as a common base to the relationship between all Luso phone territories, however, he also states this idea is rather fallible and limited, since, in the course of time, no doubt "Brazilians, Angolans, Mozambicans, Cape Verdeans, and Guineans will do with the Portuguese language what Lusitanians once did to the imperial Roman language" (6)
Although Cervantes did not invent this suicide episode, naming the boy Bariato (or Variato) and associating him with the legendary Lusitanian hero Viriatus (d.
The Negro Ensemble Company of New York City presents Peter Weiss's Song of the Lusitanian Bogey, its inaugural production, at St.
The dean of helmers, 103-year-old Portuguese maestro Manoel de Oliveira, adds another striking entry to his ever-lengthening filmography with "Gebo and the Shadow." The French-language adaptation of a Raul Brandao play, about a poor Lusitanian family awaiting the return of its vagabond offspring, offers a variation on the parable of the prodigal son.
The Lusitanian aboriginals, known formally as pequeninos, or informally as piggies, speak six languages: English and Portuguese, that they have learned from the humans, plus four of their own languages, males language, wives' language, father tongue, and tree language.
Those men who did partake of the communion were for the most part members of the administration who took advantage of the occasion to consolidate their claims to a Lusitanian identity.
Let us take, for example, Joam Airas, a bourgeois from Santiago, who was never Portuguese, but who belongs to "Portuguese literature" in all Lusitanian literary histories owing to the fact that in the national reconstruction of that time linguistic criteria (i.e., Galician Portuguese) prevails over criteria of origin.
Treatment is nothing but "brando e cordial." Although almost too perfect to believe, this depiction of the master-slave relationship, as Roberto DaMatta explains, correlates with an opinion that many have sincerely held about the Brazilian brand of slavery--that it was a "kinder, gentler" version of the institution, mitigated by a natural Lusitanian openness to other races, by a tendency to solve conflicts peacefully, or by a talent for forming cordial relationships (75-76).