Luster


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Related to Luster: Mineral Luster

lustre

(US), luster
1. 
a. a shiny metallic surface on some pottery and porcelain
b. (as modifier): lustre decoration
2. Mineralogy the way in which light is reflected from the surface of a mineral. It is one of the properties by which minerals are defined
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Luster

 

an overglaze pigment for decorating ceramic goods that has, after muffled reduction firing, a metallic or mother-of-pearl sheen. The overglaze enriches the decoration by introducing a broad range of gold, olive brown, copper, and violet tones.

Lusterware appeared in Egypt (Al-Fustat), Syria (Raqqa), Iraq (Samarra), and Iran (Susa) in the late eighth and ninth centuries. The use of luster pigments was particularly widespread in Egypt from the tenth to 12th centuries and in Iran from the 11th to 14th centuries. Egyptian and Iranian decorative tiles and ornamental dishes with representations of people and animals influenced the development of Hispano-Moresque pottery (13th–5th centuries) and Italian majolica (15th–16th centuries), of which luster painting was a prominent feature. Lusters are widely used today in Soviet and foreign decorative ceramics.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

luster

[′ləs·tər]
(optics)
The appearance of a surface dependent on reflected light; types include metallic, vitreous, resinous, adamantine, silky, pearly, greasy, dull, and earthy; applied to minerals, textiles, and many other materials.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

luster

1. An iridescent decorative surface appearance.
2. A surface or coating which imparts a gloss, sheen, glitter, or sparkle.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Luster's work only studied the connection between pubic hair grooming and chlamydia and gonorrhea.
Shortly after the disappearance, Fleming and Luster accused Francillon's biological father of being involved, claiming that a clairvoyant had told them that the boy was safe and with "someone close in his bloodline," the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.
Chairman Phillip Northam told Luster, who appeared in custody: "We appreciate your actions were not meant to be threatening but they would cause fear and distress.
(ii) Hard luster" It is produced by adding metallic colorants directly to the glaze batch and the desired reflection and color quality may be obtained by atmosphere and temperature control.
Hudson Horizons developed an audio player that organized Luster's work in the following categories: commercials, news and network promos, narration, documentary and episodic and entertainment promos.
LUSTER - Luster is the surface glow, as well as the deep mirror-like reflection of light, or 'inner light'.
Luster's first duties will be to develop necessary strategic partners and consulting firms that HBS BioEnergy will need for the initial stages of production," said Harry Masuda, CEO of Human BioSystems.
Luster was found guilty in his absence of 86 offences.
Lawyer Barry Novack, who won an pounds 11 million verdict for one of the women, said it appeared Luster was trying to get rid of assets to avoid paying damages.
A California judge has ordered Andrew Luster, heir to the Max Factor cosmetics fortune, to pay more than $20 million in damages to a woman he drugged and raped after meeting her at a college bar, preserving the act on videotape.
A California judge told Luster, 39, the great-grandson of cosmetics legend Max Factor, to pay the 30-year-old, identified only as Tonja Doe, more than $20 million for her pain and suffering.