Catulus

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Catulus

(kăch`o͝oləs), family of ancient Rome, of the Lutatian gens. Caius Lutatius Catulus was consul in 242 B.C. He won the great Roman naval victory over Carthage off the Aegates (modern Aegadian Isles) that ended the First Punic War. Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. 87 B.C., was consul in 102 B.C. His colleague in the consulship was MariusMarius, Caius
, c.157 B.C.–86 B.C., Roman general. A plebeian, he became tribune (119 B.C.) and praetor (115 B.C.) and was seven times consul. He served under Scipio Africanus Minor at Numantia and under Quintus Metellus against Jugurtha.
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, with whom he went north to oppose a Germanic invasion. He had to retreat before the Cimbri until Marius returned from Gaul. The two then defeated the Cimbri near Vercelli in 101 B.C. He later opposed Marius in the Social War and favored Sulla. Proscribed by the Marians, he either committed suicide or was killed. He was the patron of a literary circle and was himself a writer and a philosopher. Cicero praises his oratory. His son, also Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. c.60 B.C., was consul in 78 B.C. He opposed the constitutional changes sought by Marcus Lepidus (d. 77 B.C.; see under LepidusLepidus
, family of the ancient Roman patrician gens Aemilia. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, d. 152 B.C., was a consul in 187 and 175 B.C., a censor in 179 B.C., and pontifex maximus [high priest] from 180 B.C.
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), and when Lepidus led a revolt, Catulus and Pompey defeated him. Catulus was censor in 65 B.C. He was the leader of the archconservative group. He led the minority opposing the conferring of unusual powers on Pompey by the Manilian Law in 66 B.C., and he was one of the bitterest opponents of Julius Caesar.
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78 and 2016c) evidence concerning Pompeius' defiance of Sulla and Lepidus' hostility before his election and Sulla's death, instead speculating that the latter <<enjoyed the approbation of Sulla and the aristocracy>> and that only Lepidus and Lutatius Catulus had been allowed to stand for the consulship of 78.
(16) Origo gentis Romanae 9, 2: At vero Lutatius non modo Antenorem, sed ipsum Aeneam proditorem patriae fuisse tradit.
Lutatius Catulus' proconsular command lapsed after Lepidus' defeat.
Lutatius Catulus, Hortensius dominated the law courts during the 70s and, though he was ultimately excelled by Cicero, none the less remained a leader even amongst the principes of the senate.
In the Peace of Lutatius, they defined for the powers two separate spheres, taking Sicily and the nearby islands for themselves and leaving Carthage with Sardinia and the Maghreb.
If anything, Pliny might be aligned not so much with Catullus and the neoterics as with the pre-neoterics like Lutatius Catulus (mentioned by Pliny in his list of past orator/poets at 5.3.5) who were strongly influenced by Hellenistic poetics and wrote short, careful, varied nugae.
Lutatius Cerco, to consult the lots at Praeneste.(23) Certainly, the Senate held the lots at Caere and Falerii in sufficient awe to accept alterations in their condition as prodigia, but senatorial reverence never went so far as to sanction an official consultation of the gods by such means.(24) Much more significantly, in conducting those aspects of the res publica most directly affecting the gods, the Romans almost never had recourse to sortition.
Birth and early career unknown; rose to prominence as an officer under Sulla; was appointed propraetor of Sicily (81); designated by Sulla for the consulship of 78, he set about dismantling Sulla's aristocratic constitution, perhaps even before Sulla's death, although he encountered opposition from his fellow consul Quintus Lutatius Catulus; moved to recall the exiles, reinstitute tribunal power, renew cheap grain, and redistribute land; determined to seek a second consulship to continue his program, he raised troops in northern Italy en route to his proconsular province of Transalpine Gaul (roughly the southeast third of France) (77); declared a public enemy (March?