Lutein Cells

Lutein Cells

 

the glandular-epithelial cells that form the outer layer of the corpus luteum.

Lutein cells develop from cells of the Graafian follicle, usually after it sheds the oocyte (ovulation). The protoplasm of lutein cells contains a lipid pigment called lutein (one of the lipochromes). Lutein cells elaborate the hormone progesterone. They break down with the involution of the corpus luteum during the second half of pregnancy, before estrus, and before menstruation.

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Although some fibromas may contain luteinized cells, they do not have the particular association with fibroblasts so characteristic of the sclerosing stromal tumor and do not show the vacuolization typical of the lutein cells in the sclerosing lesion.
A tumor only falls in this category when the definitional admixture of fibroblasts and lutein cells is present.
Also, the scattering of Leydig cells between the lobules of a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor is relatively distinctive and unlike the more even scattering of usually singly dispersed lutein cells in the stroma of the AGCT.
Of course, the stromal lutein cells of the Krukenberg tumor will be inhibin positive.
The study was reported that TGF-[alpha] expression increases by the development of the follicles and lutein cells also reach a maximum level during mid-luteal phase.