Lycaon


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Lycaon

turned to wolf for cannibalistic activities; whence, lycanthropy. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 37]

Lycaon

king turned into a wolf for having served human flesh. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 570]
References in periodicals archive ?
Recordemos cuando representa a Lycaon, en realidad esta representando a un amigo, de hecho humaniza al animal de cuatro patas poniendole dos zapatillas o ?
with his own moral interpretation of the ur-werewolf Lycaon, whose fable serves as prologue to the stories of human-animal transformations in the Metamorphoses.
Moreover, a revision of the carnivoran remains from La Puebla de Valverde enables to discount the presence of Lycaon falconeri, previously cited by Kurten and Crusafont-Pairo (1977) in this locality on the basis of a decidual upper premolar that probably belongs to a hyaenid.
Lycaon pictus had a very large historical distribution inhabiting all African ecosystems south of Sahara, with the exception of tropical forests.
Beauty and size go together; witness Achilles' less than subtle statement to Lycaon at Iliad 21.
Originally thought to be among them was Canis lupus lycaon, the wolf that originally occupied the region from eastern Minnesota to the Atlantic and from central Ontario to parts of the northeastern United States.
The sister taxa hypothesis between these last genera (100% BP) was included in the set of conflicting clades since its grouping with Lycaon Brookes 1827 is conflictive.
A longstanding curiosity has been the degree of genetic closeness between wolves in the eastern United States and Canada - the red wolf, Canis rufus, and the eastern Canadian wolf, Canis lycaon - and the larger gray wolf found in western North American, Canis lupus.
2009: Human-wildlife conflict in northern Botswana: livestock predation by Endangered African wild dog Lycaon pictus and other carnivores.
The species, whose scientific name is Lycaon pictus, had been officially listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List in 1990.
Arguing that Ovid "construct[s] a civic dimension to the act of reading and provide[s] a new sphere to measure the powers of the poet" (167), Feldherr provides stimulating readings of Lycaon and Pythogoras in the context of sacrificial ritual; of the Theban sequence (particularly the deaths of Actaeon and Pentheus) in relation to gladiatorial spectacle; and of the Philomela story as it resonates with tragedy and issues of ethnic identification linked with the categories of Greek, Roman, and "barbarian.
Metamorphosis "is a process by which characteristics of a person, essential or incidental, are given physical embodiments and so are rendered visible and manifest" (31) The character of Lycaon, a particularly brutal and bloodthirsty individual who is transformed into a wolf, is one example of such "continuity and permanence" because the defining trait of the individual--his savagery--is thus maintained.