Lychnis


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Lychnis

 

a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Caryophyllaceae. The stems are erect, slightly branched, with large opposite leaves. The flowers are five-parted, in an apical cymose inflorescence. The corolla is red, brick-red, or pink; more rarely it is white or pale yellow. The fruit is a unilocular capsule. There are approximately ten species, distributed predominantly in the northern temperate zone of the Old World. Eight species are found in the USSR, mainly in Siberia and in the Far East, where they usually grow in meadows, along forest edges, and among low shrubbery. Many species of Lychnis are ornamentals. Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica), which has long stems and dense, bright inflorescences, is widely cultivated. L. fulgens and its garden hybrids, which have very large flowers gathered in loose inflorescences, are also widely cultivated. The genus Coronaria is often united with the genus Lychnis.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this short passage we are in the presence of birds singing (one by fits), calling, cawing, and flying; lambs bleating; their neighbor chopping wood quietly (Dorothy explaining the apparent oxymoron); hens cackling, flies humming, women talking, trees (pear, plum, apple, ash) blossoming (some greenish and some green, which is different--and different still, a few days earlier, was the vale of Grasmere, when it was "greener than green"); and flowers budding (stichwort, one Lychnis), passing their prime (primroses), and just being (the woodsorrel being there "for ever more," referring, one supposes, to their extension in space rather than time).
And there's alchemilla mollis, Japanese anemones - especially the white varieties - aquilegias, astrantias, brunnera, campanula persicifolia, coreopsis verticillata, dicentra spectabilis, doronicum Miss Mason, echinops ritro, geraniums Wargrave, grandiflorum and Johnson's Blue, geum Mrs Bradshaw and Lady Stratheden, heleniums, hemerocallis or day lillies, lupins, lychnis coronaria, monarda, nepeta, phlox, pulmonarias, rudbeckias, sedum spectabile, sidalcea, stachys lanata and tradescantia.
X 1959 Si Caryophyllaceae Lychnis coronaria (L.) Desr.
Many more self-sown cultivated flowers bloom at different seasons: Lychnis coronaria, cousin to the campion, with silver-green leaves and plum-red flowers, larkspur, columns of blue or white campulas, purple-haloed teasels, Sweet Williams, honesty, valerian and violets.
Bold Delicate Glossy Variegated Red/Bronze Bergenia Achillea Ajuga Aegopodium Ajuga Hosta Aquilegia Sedum Ajuga Heuchera Artemisia Bergenia Heuchera Husker's Red Cerastium Lamium Sedum Perovskia Polemonium Thymus Blue Silver/Grey Yellow/Lime Spiky Fuzzy Aquilegia Artemisia Hosta Armeria Lychnis cor.
The following is a list of both nectar and host plants: Achillea, allium, antirrhinum, aquilegia, armeria, artemesia, ascelepia, boltonia, buddleia, campanula, caryopteris, centranthus, chelone, coreopsis delphinium, dianthus, digitalis, echinacea, erigerion, erynigium, eupatorium, foeniciculum, gaillardia, gaura, helenium, hemerocallis, hypericum, hyssops, inula, leucanthemum, liatris, lobelia, lychnis, lysimachia, malva, monarda, nepeta, origanum, penstemon, perovskia, phlox, physotegia, rudbekia, rue, salix, salvia, sedum, sempervivum, thalictrum, thymus, valeriana, veronica, veronicastrum, humulus, loncera, campsis, loncera, and viola.
Drought stress and inbreeding depression in Lychnis flos-cuculi (Caryophyllaceae).
The Peruvian lilies, alstomeria, are losing their stripey brilliance while the Rose Campions, lychnis coronaria, are just looking dusty.
& Godr.; = Lychnis alba Miller; = Melandrium album (Miller) Garcke], is a dioecious perennial commonly found in highly disturbed habitats (McNeill, 1977).
Lychnis flos-cuculi ydi'r enw Lladin arno fo, a'r lychnis yn dangos ei fod yn perthyn i lwyth y campion - hynny ydi, yr un teulu a'r blodyn neidr.
subsp, alba (Mill.) Greuter & Burdet; SYN: Lychnis alba Mill.; White Campion, White Cockle, Evening Campion; Wet ditch and open woods on south side of CR875N; Infrequent but locally common; C = 0; BSUH 14738.
Few of the lychnis species can claim to be spectacular garden flowers but their modest presence adds interest and background colour ( usually scarlet, pink or mauve.