Lycian Peninsula

Lycian Peninsula

 

a peninsula in Turkey, in southwestern Asia Minor. It juts 75 km out into, the Mediterranean Sea between the Gulf of Antalya and the Gulf of Fethiye. A large part of the peninsula is occupied by the mountains of the Western Taurus (the Elmah, Bey Dağlan, and Teke ranges), which reach elevations of 3,086 m and are composed chiefly of limestone. The mountains have steep slopes. There are lakes and solonchaks in the central part of the peninsula. The coasts are precipitous and have narrow bays. Maquis grows in the coastal zone, while there are broad-leaved and coniferous forests higher up. There is solonchak semidesert in the hollows.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bounded by Fethiye to the west, Antalya to the east and Korkuteli to the north, the 'bulge' of the Lycian peninsula is also one of Turkey's most strikingly beautiful regions, with snow-capped mountains, serpentine shorelines hiding secluded beaches and nearly a hundred ancient cities, towns and other archaeological sites.
Kate Clow, an Englishwoman who lives in Turkey, undertook the massive task of clearing the scrub from ancient Roman roads and mule trails, waymarking 310 miles around the Lycian peninsula and writingthe definitive guide to this long distance pathway.