Lycidas


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Lycidas

Milton’s elegy for his friend, Edward King (1637). [Br. Lit.: NCE, 1781]
See: Grief
References in classic literature ?
And before we can admire his great poem which he wrote later, we may love the beauty of L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, and Lycidas, which he wrote now.
In Lycidas Milton mourns the death of a friend who was drowned while crossing the Irish Channel.
Rose," the "Pink," and the "Jessamine" are flowers transplanted from Milton's Lycidas (40, 143-46): the "wild Thyme," the "pale Jessamine," the "white Pink," and the "Musk-rose.
More who finds that when the angels in Lycidas "sing" in "sweet Societies" of what is ineffable (179 and cf.
Run-of-the-mill Transcendentalists likewise cannot escape doing such things as using the conclusion of Lycidas to recommend a self-interested balancing act between "a love of liberty and passion for reform," on the one hand, and submission to "the cultural authority of poet-priests" on the other (p.
Instead of invoking the pastoral elegy tradition of Milton's Lycidas and Shelley's Adonais, a model that associates mourning with classical learning and with a specifically masculine tribute from one male poet to another, Tennyson initially positions himself within the Victorian sphere of domestic intimacy.
He says: "The big guns like old Main Beach and the promising three-year-old Lycidas are ones to look forward to and they'll be out again at the end of March.
As a representation of Ecclesia, the Countess also challenges English episcopacy so that the entertainment anticipates themes of Milton's Lycidas.
Feminist Elegy/Feminist Prophecy: Lycidas, The Waves, Kristeva, Cixous.
Regal, it perched on its bough-crotch to guard Blake and Lycidas, Augustine, Hardy, and Hamlet, Baudelaire and Rimbaud, and I knew that yellow eyes, Unsleeping, stared as I slept.
Lycidas hot for Coles Newmarket trainer Toby Coles added to Main Beach's Kempton success on Friday by sending out Lycidas to land the second division of the 1m maiden under Seb Sanders.
The focus shifts away from Lycidas, who stands for the deceased Edward King, and onto the poet figure within the poem, suggesting just one more remove to arrive at the poet himself, Milton, as he self-consciously ponders his career, what he has done and what he has yet to do.