Lycodes

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lycodes

 

a genus of fishes of the family Zoarcidae. Of the approximately 50 species, 45 are found in the northern hemisphere. Lycodes live primarily in arctic seas (16 species in the USSR) and in the Sea of Okhotsk (18 species). They are benthic fishes, living primarily at depths of 100–500 m (only five species live at depths of 1,500–2,000 m). They prefer silty gravel and low temperatures and feed on benthic invertebrates or, more rarely, other fishes. Many species bury themselves in the silt. They are usually small, but certain species may reach 1 m in length. Although their flesh is tasty, they have no commercial significance.

REFERENCES

Andriiashev, A. P. Ryby severnykh morei SSSR. Moscow-Leningrad, 1954.
Zhizn’ zhivotnykh, vol 4, part 1. Moscow, 1971.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lycodes akuugun, a new species of eelpout (Perciformes: Zoarcidae) from the Aleutian Islands.
In addition to qualitative observation of all 47 species, quantitative estimates of %Hb polymerized RBCs were conducted for 7 species found to exhibit Hb polymerization: Boreogadus saida (Lepechin, 1774); Lycodes reticulatus Reinhardt, 1835; Gadus morhua Linnaeus, 1758; Urophycis chuss (Walbaum, 1792); Merluccius bilinearis (Mitchill, 1814); Pollachius pollachius (Linnaeus, 1758); and Notacanthus chemnitzii Bloch, 1788.
In addition to the species listed in Table 1, Johansen mentioned, in an unpublished manuscript, nine other species: broad whitefish (Coregonus nasus), sardine cisco (Coregonus sardinella), saffron cod (Eleginus gracilis), fourline snakeblenny (Eumesogrammus praecisus), fish doctor (Gymnelus viridis), polar eelpout (Lycodes turneri), hamecon (Artediellus scaber), Artedius sp.
The otoliths from two Canadian eelpout, Lycodes polaris, were also measureable, but because no size or weight conversions have been developed for this species, fish size could not be estimated (Table 5).
Other common species included Blackbelly Eelpout (Lycodes pacificus) and Pacific Tomcod (Microgadus proximus).
Species that were captured only by seine were Arctic cisco and threespine stickleback (Gasterasteus aculeatus), whereas species captured only by trawl were longhead dab (Limanda proboscidea), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), whitespotted green ling (Hexagrammos stelleri), and marbled eelpout (Lycodes raridens).
11 productus (Pacific Hake) GADIDAE Microgadus N X X 36 148 24 proximus (Pacific S X X X 31 144 21 Tomcod) ZORACIDAE Lycodes O X X X 6 155 51 cortezianus (Bigfin Eelpout) GASTEROSTEIDAE Gasterosteus S X 1 66 aculeatus (Threespine Stickleback) SEBASTIDAE Sebastes caurinus O X 1 170 (Copper Rockfish) Sebastes melanops S X 1 185 (Black Rockfish) Sebastes flavidus O X 1 432 (Yellowtail Rockfish) Sebastes elongatus O X X 9 111 34 (Greenstriped Rockfish) Sebastes goodei O X X 2 181 15 (Chilipepper) Sebastes levis S X 1 110 (Cowcod) Sebastes crameri O X X X 15 96 226 (Darkblotched Rockfish) Sebastes O X 1 104 semicinctus (Halfbanded Rockfish) Sebastes spp.
Furthermore, species that were associated with both 80 and 160 m included large spiny dogfish, and quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger), brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus), blackbelly eelpout (Lycodes pacificus), Pacific tomcod (Microgadus proximus), walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma), shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregate), pile perch (Rhacochilus vacca), black tip poacher (Xeneretmus latifrons), slender sole (Lyopsetta exilis), and plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus; Fig.
Some eelpouts (Lycodes spp.), sculpins (Cottunculus spp.) and other snailfish species (Paraliparis bathybius, Rhodichthys regina, and Careproctus spp.) were also taken, but in very low abundance.
crameri), because this is an important commercial species; kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus); and bigfin eelpout (Lycodes cortezianus), because the day-night activity patterns of the latter two have been studied in shallow temperate areas (Moulton, 1977).