Lycopsida

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Related to Lycopsid: gymnosperm

Lycopsida

[lī′käp·sə·də]
(botany)
Former subphylum of the Embryophyta now designated as the division Lycopodiophyta.
References in periodicals archive ?
Younger in age than the famous assemblage from the lycopsid stumps at Joggins (Pennsylvanian: Bashkirian: Langsettian), vertebrate fossils from Florence generally are better preserved than those from loggins and more or less coeval with the Linton cannel coal, so that meaningful comparisons between the Florence and Linton assemblages could be made.
Of the many other plants that occur rarely, representatives of the lycopsids, sphenopsids, ferns, pteridosperms, and cordaitaleans are present.
Dawson (1882) exposed an entire fossil forest horizon comprising 25 lycopsid trees entombed in the "Lesser Reef of Coal Mine Point".
While breaking apart lycopsid casts in search of plant material, they stumbled across a diverse assemblage of animal remains, including reptile bones and land snail shells (Lyell and Dawson 1853).
It proved to be the finest specimen of a lycopsid tree ever extracted from the Joggins section, "having the whole of its woody axis perfectly preserved, in situ, and showing structure" (Dawson 1877, p.
The main levels of standing trees, dominated by lycopsids, were entombed where distributary channels brought sand into coastal wetlands.
Although sparse, the presence of lycopsid foliage and aerial stems in the upper two-thirds of the section indicates that standing water was available for their reproduction (Phillips and DiMichele 1992), at least temporarily or in restricted areas of the landscape.
A fossil lycopsid forest succession in the classic Joggins section of Nova Scotia: palaeoecology of a disturbance-prone Pennsylvanian wetland.
The formation is known for its rich flora of zosterophyllophytes, trimerophytes and lycopsids (Gensel and Andrews 1984) and was one of the first sources of Devonian plants to be described in the literature (Dawson 1859).
Gymnosperms were proliferating rapidly along with the other important components of vegetation including lycopsids and sphenopsids.
Comparative ecology and life-history biology of arborescent lycopsids in Late Carboniferous swamps of Euramerica.