Lyctidae

Lyctidae

[′lik·tə‚de]
(invertebrate zoology)
The large-winged beetles, a large cosmopolitan family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Bostrichoidea.

Lyctidae

 

a family of small beetles of the suborder Polyphaga. The body is oblong and flattened on top. The legs are five-segmented with a reduced first segment. The antennae have a two-segmented club. The larvae are legless and white. Lyctidae develop in dry wood, on which both the beetles and the larvae feed. There are over 100 species found almost everywhere in the world (with the exception of the polar regions). There are six species in the USSR, of which two (Lyctus line arts and L. pubescens ) are widespread and two (L. suturalis and L. brunneus ) are indigenous only to the Caucasus and Middle Asia. Lyctidae damage structures, telegraph poles, furniture, and other wooden items. Control requires treating the wood or covering its surface with protective agents or long-acting insecticides.

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Coleoptera Lyctidae e Bostrichidae intercettati nel porto e negli ambienti urbani di Venezia.
Potter writes that the two most common and destructive families in Kentucky, for example, are the Lyctidae, which attacks only hardwoods, so infestations are most often found in wood paneling, molding, window and door frames, plywood, hardwood, and floors; and the Anobiid, which attacks hardwoods and softwoods usually found in such structural members as beams, sills, joists, studs, and subflooring.
Powder-post Beetle--Any of the beetles of the families Ptinidae, Anobiidae, Bostrichidae, or Lyctidae, which breed in old, dry wood and reduce it to powder.