Lycurgus


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Related to Lycurgus: ephors, Gerousia

Lycurgus

(līkûr`gəs), traditional name of the founder of the Spartan constitution. The earliest mention of him is in Herodotus. Nothing is known of his life—when he lived or if he was a real man, a god, or a mythical figure. However, he is generally associated with the 7th cent. B.C. at the time when a revolt of the Messenian subjects nearly ruined Sparta. Lycurgus led a reform in the government and in the city's social system to establish a machine of war that would preclude further trouble from the helots and other subjects. Some features of the unique Spartan system were certainly more recent than 600 B.C. Later classical writers added details to his life as the tradition developed until Plutarch actually wrote a biography.

Lycurgus,

c.396–c.325 B.C., one of the Ten Attic Orators of the Alexandrian canon; pupil of Isocrates. A capable and honored public official, he administered the state finances from 338 to 326 B.C. and led (with Demosthenes) the anti-Macedonian party. One of his official acts ordered the editing and preserving of the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. A single oration (Against Leocrates) is extant.

Lycurgus

 

legendary Spartan lawgiver said to have lived in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C. in ancient Greece.

Information concerning the life of Lycurgus is varied and contradictory. Greek authors of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. ascribe to him the creation of institutions of Spartan society and state structure, which actually took shape in the course of a lengthy historical transition from a primitive communal structure to class society. Lycurgus is said to have divided up the Laconian lands with their enserfed Helots into equal shares distributed among the Spartans and into smaller shares for the perioeci. He is supposed to have created the council of elders (gerousia) and the popular assembly (apella). He introduced public refectories and stern methods of bringing up children. In the third century B.C., Kings Agis IV and Cleomenes III carried out reforms with the stated aim of restoring what Lycurgus had created. A special cult of Lycurgus existed in Sparta.

REFERENCE

Micheli, H. Sparta. Cambridge, 1952.

Lycurgus

9th century bc, Spartan lawgiver. He is traditionally regarded as the founder of the Spartan constitution, military institutions, and educational system
References in classic literature ?
Were the experiment to be seriously made, though it required some effort to view it seriously even in fiction, I leave it to be decided by the sample of opinions just exhibited, whether, with all their enmity to their predecessors, they would, in any one point, depart so widely from their example, as in the discord and ferment that would mark their own deliberations; and whether the Constitution, now before the public, would not stand as fair a chance for immortality, as Lycurgus gave to that of Sparta, by making its change to depend on his own return from exile and death, if it were to be immediately adopted, and were to continue in force, not until a BETTER, but until ANOTHER should be agreed upon by this new assembly of lawgivers.
What if some man or youth imagines that he is a Lycurgus or Mahomet--a future one of course--and suppose he begins to remove all obstacles.
Manu's Laws were written long before Lycurgus of Sparta or Solon of Athens.
Beck, "Plato, Plutarch, and the Use and Manipulation of Anecdotes in the Lives of Lycurgus and Agesilaus.
One of Ellison's recent projects, for example, was to try to re-create the glass used to make the fourth-century Roman Lycurgus Cup.
As the story goes, after the Thracian King Lycurgus banned worship of Dionysus, he killed one of the wine god's loyal followers, Ambrosia, by turning her into a grape vine.
In the myth of Lycurgus, an opponent to the wine god Dionysus, violence committed against Ambrosia turns her into a grapevine.
even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods--he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus (Il.
Lycurgus Bell and the more than 100,000 Southern soldiers who fought for Abraham Lincoln thought they knew.
It was very tradition-bound and one of its legendary law-givers, Lycurgus, had even forbidden the writing of the laws of the city-state.
In addition, well-read Americans knew that Lycurgus, Sparta's great creator of laws and culture, designed Sparta's system to produce loyal warriors who shunned all worldly pleasures and individuality in favor of service to the state (Sparta and Our Own Country 1839, 354).
Beide Supplemente enthalten einen Besuch bei Lycurgus, der bestohlen wird (vgl.