Lydgate


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Lydgate

John. ?1370--?1450, English poet and monk. His vast output includes devotional works and translations, such as that of a French version of Boccaccio's The Fall of Princes (1430--38)
References in periodicals archive ?
Lydgate became the first additional needs schools in Kirklees to have pupils climb the 1,085 metre (3,559ft) mountain in 2016.
This review essay examines three recent studies of early English drama that participate in these conversations and also take them in new directions: Claire Sponsler's The Queen's Dumbshows: John Lydgate and the Making of Early Theater (2014); Charlotte Steenbrugge's Staging Vice: A Study of Dramatic Traditions in Medieval and Sixteenth-Century England and the Low Countries (2014); and Kurt A.
Lydgate was a Late Middle English poet writing in the East Midland dialect and greatly inspired by Geoffrey Chaucer.
True, the performance pieces of fifteenth-century poet John Lydgate are the focus of its investigation, and true, a late chapter headed "The Queen's Dumbshows" concentrates on three entertainments whose prime audience seems to have been Catherine of Valois, mother of the young King Henry VI.
Claire Sponsler's admirable new book is a corrective to the vision of John Lydgate as a writer of court, monastery, and city that puts his dramatic entertainments at the center of inquiry.
Much of the study approaches the poet John Lydgate through the "voice" of John Shirley, the fifteenth-century scribe who copied Lydgate's performance pieces, and the first chapter is spent on the issues of the manuscripts.
The Queens Dumbshows: John Lydgate and the Making of Early Theater.
Shakespeare and Spenser figure prominently in this thought-provoking study, as William Kuskin connects their writing to late-medieval authors such as Caxton, Hoccleve, Lydgate, and Chaucer.
In the prologue of this lengthy retelling of Boccaccio's De Casibus Virorum Illustrium, Lydgate introduces an extensive homage to 'my maistir Chaucer', which lists several of Chaucer's literary accomplishments: it opens with stanzas on 'Troilus & Cresseide', 'Boeces book, The Consolacioun', and 'a tretis, ful noble & off gret pris/ Vpon thastlabre' (Lydgate 1924-27, 1: 8-9).
The range of texts covers Middle English, Latin, French, and German and authors such as Chaucer, Lydgate, Malory, Christine de Pisan, and Chretien de Troyes.
After a brief introduction, Bale and Edwards present a critical edition of the lives of two Anglo-Saxon saints as told by the fifteenth-century writer John Lydgate, along with the "extra miracles" of St.
Her introduction puts Lydgate in the context of his time and the performance tradition.