Lydgate


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Lydgate

John. ?1370--?1450, English poet and monk. His vast output includes devotional works and translations, such as that of a French version of Boccaccio's The Fall of Princes (1430--38)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The defibrillator, which gives a short electric shock to the heart through the chest wall to someone in cardiac arrest, has been installed at Lydgate Styles, Huddersfield Road, Shelley.
Her work on John Lydgate, monk and public poet, was her most explicit plea for what she described as the "pervasiveness of late medieval genre blurring and media mixing, a blurring and mixing of which Lydgate himself seems to have been fully aware." (14) She wanted to extend this insight about the "fluid nature of representational forms" (94) beyond Lydgate to fifteenth-century culture in general.
Lincoln - and John Lydgate, who said it before him - were bang on the money.
This review essay examines three recent studies of early English drama that participate in these conversations and also take them in new directions: Claire Sponsler's The Queen's Dumbshows: John Lydgate and the Making of Early Theater (2014); Charlotte Steenbrugge's Staging Vice: A Study of Dramatic Traditions in Medieval and Sixteenth-Century England and the Low Countries (2014); and Kurt A.
An historiated initial on the opening page to a manuscript of John Lydgate's Fall of Princes (Chicago, Newberry Library MS 33.3) has escaped notice and is not mentioned in any published descriptions of the manuscript (Fig.
The present paper focuses on the language of John Lydgate's works.
The two fifteenth-century texts by Lydgate were the focus of the analysis; it was not uncommon for Lydgate's Seige of Thebes to be paired with Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
True, the performance pieces of fifteenth-century poet John Lydgate are the focus of its investigation, and true, a late chapter headed "The Queen's Dumbshows" concentrates on three entertainments whose prime audience seems to have been Catherine of Valois, mother of the young King Henry VI.
Claire Sponsler's admirable new book is a corrective to the vision of John Lydgate as a writer of court, monastery, and city that puts his dramatic entertainments at the center of inquiry.
Much of the study approaches the poet John Lydgate through the "voice" of John Shirley, the fifteenth-century scribe who copied Lydgate's performance pieces, and the first chapter is spent on the issues of the manuscripts.
Shakespeare and Spenser figure prominently in this thought-provoking study, as William Kuskin connects their writing to late-medieval authors such as Caxton, Hoccleve, Lydgate, and Chaucer.
Among John Lydgate's various tributes to Chaucer, one of the most puzzling is his reference to the Book of the Duchess in the Fall of Princes (c.