toxic epidermal necrolysis

(redirected from Lyell syndrome)
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toxic epidermal necrolysis

[¦tak·sik ‚ep·ə‚dər·məl nə′kräl·ə·səs]
(medicine)
Intraepidermal blistering and separation of the outer epidermis, giving the appearance and the management problems of a scald, caused by infection with Staphylococcus aureus strains producing one of the epidermolytic toxins, usually of phage group II. Also known as scalded skin syndrome.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Until the outbreak of PCP outlined in this article, pediatric renal transplant recipients in our hospital and other pediatric renal transplant units in Germany were not given PCP prophylaxis routinely because of possible side effects, such as a rise of serum creatinine values, myelosuppression, and Lyell syndrome. We had not observed any case of PCP in our transplant recipients for the last 20 years without prophylaxis.