Lyly


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Lyly

John. ?1554--1606, English dramatist and novelist, noted for his two romances, Euphues, or the Anatomy of Wit (1578) and Euphues and his England (1580), written in an elaborate style
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Introducing his book Shakespeare and the Late Moral Plays, Alan Dessen sets out his stall with reference to the "highly heterogeneous group of plays written, published, and performed during the first half of Queen Elizabeth's reign (the boyhoods of Marlowe and Shakespeare)--in effect, the last wave of the moral dramatic tradition before the advent of Lyly, Kyd, and Marlowe in the mid 1580s." (11) This new set of writers are not described as highly heterogenous, and while Dessen does not spell out the implications of this sentence, such writers are certainly associated by many scholars with generic types, Lyly with comedy and Kyd and Marlowe with tragedy.
Nicholson, though, is at her own eloquent best when locating the three literary giants of her study--John Lyly, Edmund Spenser and Christopher Marlowe--within her landscape of homely lexical fields and outlandish stylistic monuments.
Known for his involvement in the printing of the Shakespeare First Folio and for his publishing the early seventeenth-century collection of plays by William Alexander (TheMonarchicke Tragedies, 1604), Edward Blount in 1632 decided to resurrect six of John Lyly's plays, which he had printed by William Stansby.
Miss Lyly, who previously held the position of Buying Manager at leading outdoor retailer Mountain Warehouse, has been brought on board to drive and develop the buying function at a time of significant growth and expansion.
In the chapter on romantic comedy, Arab places her examination of Shakespeare's and Lyly's lowborn characters in the context of Castiglione's discussion of aristocratic manliness as either performative or as evidence of the innate superiority of gentle blood.
Despite several memorable dramatic works, Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1578) is Lyly's most famous text.
Alongside an original analysis of the significance of legal processes to a range of social contexts, Hutson offers novel readings of Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, Lyly's Mother Bombie, Jonson's Every Man in his Humour, and Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors, Loves Labours Lost, Much Ado about Nothing, and Titus Andronicus, and also provides fresh insights into Hamlet, 2 Henry VI, Henry V, and Othello.
Cyber Lyly's bracelets are coated with recyc led newspapers in a riot of colours.
Subsequent chapters examine complex scenes of instruction in the work of John Lyly, Philip Sidney, and Edmund Spenser, addressing the uneasy relationship between the "repertory of representational conventions" (18) inculcated in a Tudor schoolboy and the agendas of the didactic romancer.
(25) Analysing a group of these texts, including Pettie and also Lyly's two Euphues narratives, Fleming argues that the construction of an imagined audience of women endorses the aggressive heterosexuality of the author: 'the imagined presence of a female reader [...] enables early English fiction to appear to be manly enough'.
Instead, his corpus is a selection of canonical texts: John Lyly's Euphues, Sir Philip Sidney's Old and New Arcadia, and Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene.
John Lyly's Saphho and Phao opens at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford on Thursday for a four-date run.