lymphokine

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lymphokine

[′lim·fə‚kīn]
(immunology)
A cytokine released from T lymphocytes after contact with an antigen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the autoimmunity and inflammation require a lot of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin, lymphokine, or chemokine to form a network in which mediator orchestrates proinflammatory cascades [49]; hence, we performed CCI analysis [19] based mainly on changes of DNA methylation in TSS200, first exon or TSS1500, protein-protein network [19, 50], and the interesting phenotype to identify this inflammatory network due to differential methylation of cytokine gene (also named as "hotspots").
Effect of mouse lymphokines and cloned mouse interferon-y on the interaction of Rickettsia prowazekii with mouse macrophagelike RAW264.7 cells.
In this regard, MYC expression that is regulated by external cellular stimulus including hormones, growth factors, cytokines, lymphokines, nutritional status, development and differentiation (Levens et al., 1997), is connected to various physiological processes.
The participation of lymphocytes to the healing process is largely associated with their production of cytokines and growth factors (lymphokines).
It suppresses humoral as well as cell mediated reaction and delayed hypersensitivity through specific and reversible inhibition of immune competent lymphocytes and also inhibits lymphokines production and release.
Under the definition of peptide hormones superfamily, they are defined as the intercellular messengers like adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, resistin), cytokines (chemokines, hematopoietic growth factors, hepatocyte growth factor, interferons, interleukines, lymphokines, monokines, osteopontin, transforming growth factor beta, TNF), endothelial growth factors, endothelins, fibroblast growth factor, quinines (bradykinin, kininogens, tachykinin) and platelet derived growth factor (see, http://www.ncbi.nlm.
In fact, it is believed that in the 1918 worldwide pandemic, more young people died from that strain of influenza because of a more robust immune response and sudden influx of lymphocytes into the lungs caused by the "cytokine storm," the release of myriad chemoattractants and lymphokines.
Macrophage are responsive to a number of lymphokines that induce their growth differentiation and activation; since lymphokines are released by primed lymphocytes, produced chiefly by T-lymphocytes, on contact with an antigen [21], and the demonstration of a lymphookine mediated reaction in this study strongly supported the existence of T like lymphocytes in Tilapias and that the fish is capable of delayed hypersensitivity reactions.
Cytokines include the interleukins (involved in immune response), lymphokines (involved in inflammatory response), and cell signal molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor (also involved in inflammatory response) and the interferons, the first line of defense against viral infections.
The cells secrete lymphokines which activate the bursal dependent lymphocytes (B-cell) and resulted into antibody formation.
Cytokines are a family of non-antibody immunoregulatory proteins or other biological factors, including lymphokines, interleukins, tumor necrosis factors, and interferons.

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