Lyonnesse

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Lyonnesse

(lī`ənĕs'), once a region W of Cornwall, now sunk beneath the sea more than 40 fathoms deep. The Lyonnesse of Celtic legend, the home of Tristram and of the Lady of Lyones, has been identified with Lothian in Scotland.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But while McGann and Sligh include more of Swinburne's major works (e.g., more entries from Poems and Ballads and the complete Tristram of Lyonesse [1882]), O'Gorman provides a broader and more even range of Swinburne's remarkable variety of writings, though some, such as Tristram and the verse drama Bothwell (1874), are merely excerpts.
Beleriand is larger than Tennyson's Lyonesse or Pytheas's Belarion, and occupies the west side of a continent instead of the west side of an island, but you can't have everything.
"Erotic Figuration in Swinburne's Tristram of Lyonesse, Canto 2: The Vanishing Knight and the Drift of Butterflies." Victorian Poetry, Vol.
PULLING on orange oilskins and climbing over empty fish boxes as I board the 30ft Lyonesse, in Newlyn, Cornwall, the deck shifts and it dawns on me this is no pleasure cruise around the harbour.
There is something of the untamed mythic creatures of the greenwood about her, something of the hamadryad or the woodwose or 'of faery damsels met in forest wide/By Knights of Logres, or of Lyonesse'.
The work relating the two Elaines and the experience of Sir Gareth (who is prevented from engaging in sexual activity with his beloved Lyonesse until after they are 'socially' married before a priest), and the Paston family and other contemporaries such as the Celys, provides a very insightful and useful study of the nature of wives and daughters in medieval England.
These include Lancelot's encounters with other ladies, notably Guenevere and Elaine of Corbin; the stages of Gareth and Lyonesse's courtship; Arthur and Guenevere's marriage; and knightly fathers' relationships with their illegitimate sons, including Pellynor with Torre, Bors with Elyne, Lancelot with Galahad, and finally Arthur with Mordred.
Multiple texts by one writer are listed alphabetically, so the first poem here is "The Chapel in Lyonesse" on page 289 under entry A-1786; the final on page 292-3 is Sir Galahad: A Christmas Mystery (A-1801).
The "Merlin" section, which contains the iconic sword in the stone scene, is included as well as all of Eugene Vinaver's Book VIII of Malory's Works, "The Death of King Arthur (679-719)." [3] What the editors of these anthologies have chosen to leave out is both surprising (such as A Noble Tale of Sir Lancelot du Lake or The Tale of Sir Gareth of Orkney) and understandable (The Book of Sir Tristram de Lyonesse is lengthy even by Malory's standards and is often summarized in student paperback editions).
(2) Swinburne's words are taken from the dedicatory sonnet with which he prefaces his epic poem Tristram of Lyonesse, and bears the sub-epigraph 'The Pines', April 1882'.
Fiona Curnow (pen name Maria Lyonesse) has published two books of erotic fiction under the X-Libris imprint.
But she more cruell and more salvage wylde, Then either Lyon or the Lyonesse: Shames not to be with guitlese bloud defylde, But taketh glory in her cruelnesse.