Lysias


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Lysias

(lĭs`ēəs), c.459–c.380 B.C., Attic orator; son of Cephalus, a Syracusan. After the capture (404 B.C.) of Athens by the Spartans, the Thirty Tyrants caused the arrest of Lysias and his brother Polemarchus, who was put to death. Lysias escaped to Megara, from which he returned when the tyrants were expelled (403 B.C.). He prosecuted Eratosthenes for his brother's death, and his oration against Eratosthenes is a model of Greek oratory. The tyrants had deprived him of his wealth, and he adopted the profession of writing speeches for litigants. Only 34 of his orations are extant. The clarity and elegance of his style place him among the very finest Greek orators and prose writers.

Lysias

 

Born 459 B.C.; died 380 B.C. Athenian professional speech writer; supporter of the slaveholders’ democracy.

Lysias wrote speeches for litigants on order. A wealthy alien, he lived in Athens from 412. During the rule of the Thirty Tyrants from 404 to 403, the property of the Lysias family was confiscated and his brother was executed. Lysias himself fled to Megara; he returned to Athens after the restoration of democratic government in 403. Tradition ascribes to Lysias more than 200 speeches and places him among the ten best orators of antiquity. Some 40 speeches have survived in more or less complete form. They are a rich, colorful, and often unique source for questions of the political and socioeconomic history of Athens, as well as the history of its foreign policy and everyday life. His most famous speech was directed against Eratosthenes, who was guilty of the death of Lysias’ brother. This is the only speech that Lysias delivered personally in court. He was a perfect master of the art of individualized speeches to suit the “customer.” His speeches were written in a pure, precise, and rhythmic language that was typical of the best models of Attic prose.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
Rechi. Translation and commentary by S. I. Sobolevskii. Moscow-Leningrad, 1933.

REFERENCES

Pozdeeva, I. “Politicheskie protsessy ν Afinakh ν 403–400 gg. do n.e. (po recham Lisiia).” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1961, no. 4.
Ferckel, F. Lysias und A then. Würzburg, 1937.
I. V. POZDEEVA

Lysias

?450--?380 bc, Athenian orator
References in periodicals archive ?
(2011) A Commentary on Lysias, Speeches 1-11, Oxford.
Discourse Cohesion Marked by [phrase omitted] and [phrase omitted] in Lysias. En S.
The only evidence against Myron is that his name appears on a list, scribbled by the optimistic Greek conspirator Lysias. What this "plot" actually reveals is that the Greek citizens no longer enjoy the ability to think, to speak, and to write freely.
C'est un nom bien atteste dans la tradition litteraire (un strat?[umlaut]ge chez Thucydide, un athl?[umlaut]te chez Eschine, divers individus chez Lysias, etc.), mais l'Anticl?[umlaut]s d'Heliodore ne semble pas emprunter ses traits ??
More particularly, the reference is to Plato's Phaedrus, when Phaedrus tells Socrates that he has been learning Lysias's discourse but wonders whether he will be able to remember and recite it adequately, at which point Socrates states that Phaedrus would never have decided to go for a walk if he had not already learnt the discourse by heart: "[Socrates:] when he [Phaedrus] was tired with sitting, he went out to take a walk, not until, by the dog, as I believe, he had simply learned by heart the entire discourse" (Plato, Phaedrus 134).
In Lysias 4, the speaker admits that he was drunk and on the hunt for boys and female pipers, a fact he hopes will prove that he did not enter the victim's house in murderous premeditation: "On the contrary, we admit that we were buzzed and on route to see boys and female pipers.
En Lysias Discours, tomo II: XVI-XXXV, Fragments, Les belles Lettres.
y usher, S.: Antiphon and Lysias. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1993 (reimpr.
If Orestes were being tried in Athens for homicide, perhaps he would have been tried in the Delphinium, like the speaker of Lysias 1, Euphiletus, who killed his wife's lover.
Another parallel of trials, Paul in front of the Jewish Sanhedrin being accused "for questions concerning their law" (23:28), as Claudius Lysias puts it, parallels the expectations of James and the elders.
The case is Lysias XXII Against the Comdealers, and the charge was that the retail sitopolai [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]--not the wholesale importers, the emporoi, as we might inadvertently infer from Alvey's mention of them (30, n.