Lysimachus


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Related to Lysimachus: Antigonus, Ptolemy, Seleucus, Cassander

Lysimachus

(līsĭm`əkəs), c.355–281 B.C., Thessalian general of Alexander the Great. He was a commander in Alexander's fleet on the Hydaspes as well as his bodyguard. On Alexander's death (323 B.C.) Lysimachus took control of Thrace. He joined (314 B.C.) the other Diadochi—CassanderCassander
, 358–297 B.C., king of Macedon, one of the chief figures in the wars of the Diadochi. The son of Antipater, he was an officer under Alexander the Great, but there was ill feeling between them.
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, Ptolemy IPtolemy I
(Ptolemy Soter) , d. 284 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, the first ruler of the Macedonian dynasty (or Lagid dynasty), son of a Macedonian named Lagus. He was one of the leading generals of Alexander the Great, and after Alexander's death (323 B.C.
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, and Seleucus ISeleucus I
(Seleucus Nicator) , d. 280 B.C., king of ancient Syria. An able general of Alexander the Great, he played a leading part in the wars of the Diadochi. In the new partition of the empire in 312 B.C. he received Babylonia.
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—in the league against Antigonus IAntigonus I
(Antigonus the One-Eyed or Antigonus Cyclops) , 382?–301 B.C., general of Alexander the Great and ruler in Asia. He was made (333 B.C.) governor of Phrygia, and after the death of Alexander he was advanced by the friendship of Antipater, who with Ptolemy I and
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, and after the defeat of Antigonus at Ipsus, Lysimachus took W Asia Minor as his share (301 B.C.). In 286 B.C. he added Macedon to his kingdom by defeating Pyrrhus. Five years later Lysimachus was defeated in a war with Seleucus and was killed in battle at Corupedium near Magnesia ad Sipylum. A legend says that Lysimachus' wife, Arsinoë (daughter of Ptolemy I), persuaded him to kill his son by a former marriage and that the son's widow took refuge with Seleucus and provoked the final war.

Lysimachus

 

Born 361 B.C.; died 281 B.C., in Corupedium, Phrygia. Military leader under Alexander the Great; after the death of Alexander in 323, Lysimachus became ruler of Thrace.

During the struggle of the Diadochi for power, Lysimachus joined a coalition of Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Cassander in 315 and fought against Antigonus. The war led to a second partition of the legacy of Alexander the Great. This time Lysimachus added to his possessions the Hellespont coast. In 306 he proclaimed himself king along with the other Diadochi. From 303 to 301, Lysimachus fought alongside his former allies in a successful struggle against Antigonus (Antigonus I the One-Eyed) and his son Demetrius I Poliorcetes in Asia Minor. As a result, Lysimachus added to his domain a number of regions of Asia Minor. (Antigonus I perished in 301 in a battle near Ipsus.) In 287 and 286, Lysimachus and King Pyrrhus of Epirus pushed Demetrius I out of Macedonia and subjugated the territory. His wars in the north against the Hittites and King Eumel of the Bosporus were unsuccessful. Lysimachus died in battle against Seleucus I Nicator; his army was crushed, and the state collapsed.

Lysimachus

?360--281 bc, Macedonian general under Alexander the Great; king of Thrace (323--281); killed in battle by Seleucus I
References in periodicals archive ?
Years before, in Measure for Measure, Isabella spoke to Angelo much as Marina speaks to Lysimachus, but she gained much less happy results.
With full color illustration as well as cataloguing and descriptive information about each object, the book contains a wealth of information on the coins, divided by ruler: Philip II, Alexander III, Philip II, Macedonia after the kings, the Persian kings, the Antigonid Dynasty, the Seleucid Dynasty, the Attalids, the Ptolemaic Dynasty, Lysimachus, and the Greek Dynasties in Bactria and India.
Morse built wooden platforms around the base of these pillars, creating seats upon which various royal figures--Antiochus, Pericles, Cleon, Simonides, Lysimachus, Dionyza--sat or stood when speaking, and which came to symbolize the disparate lands of Shakespeare's sprawling romance.
16) Once the boys reached manhood, Alexander Lysimachus arranged for his sons to enter disparate fields in Roman imperial service.
Gower Shawn Hamilton Pericles Ron Menzel Marina Leah Curney Antiochus Lee Mark Nelson Dionyza Kate Eifrig Simonides Steve Lewis Thaisa Teria Birlon Lysimachus Randy Reyes
He undertook to build a temple to Athena, but it was left to his general, Lysimachus King of Thrace, to fulfil that pledge.
The process was a two-way one: in the scene between Lysimachus and Marina in the brothel, Oxford's reconstruction took account of the rehearsal experiences in Ontario, a good example of fruitful co-operation between scholarship and theatre.
Nepos' book on foreign generals ended with the enumeration and brief description of the careers of fourteen kings: the Persians Cyrus, Darius, Xerxes, Artaxerxes Macrochir, and Artaxerxes Mnemon, the Macedonians Philip and Alexander, Pyrrhus, Dionysius I of Syracuse, and the Successors Antigonus, Demetrius, Lysimachus, Seleucus, and Ptolemy.
Pamela Klarup's Thaisa revealed a resistance to heightened emotion, while Philip Thompson's Lysimachus, also played presentationally, prevented the stage action from slipping into a melodramatic father-daughter rediscovery.
But 15 years later his rival Lysimachus, seized and enlarged the town, established its grid plan typical of Hellenistic cities and named it Nicaea, which it remained throughout the Byzantine era.
Pericles, who has been told that Marina is dead, finds her in Mytilene and blesses her union with Lysimachus.
Daniel May brought a quiet dignity to the comparatively small role of the governor, Lysimachus, while Carolyn Cook's icy Dionyza and Crystal Dickenson's delightfully trashy Bawd were also standouts.