Lysippos


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Lysippos

(līsĭp`əs), fl. late 4th cent. B.C., Greek sculptor, head of the Sicyon school. Hellenistic sculpture was based largely on the style he introduced. In treating the human figure, he modified the proportions set by the canon of PolykleitosPolykleitos,
 Polycletus,
or Polyclitus
, two Greek sculptors of the school of Argos. Polykleitos, the elder, fl. c.450–c.420 B.C., was a contemporary of Phidias. Born either in Sicyon or Argos, he became head of the Argive school.
..... Click the link for more information.
, making the head smaller, the form slender, the muscles close-lying. There is also a new sense of movement—torso, head, and limbs all face in different directions, indicating a momentary change of action. Of the many bronze statues and groups mentioned by Pliny and other ancient writers as his work, no certain original exists, and the marble statues accepted as copies of his bronzes probably do not follow his modeling exactly. The figure of an athlete, Apoxyomenus, in the Vatican and the Agias at Delphi are the most famous of these copies or adaptations. The copy by GlyconGlycon
, fl. c.3d cent. A.D., Athenian sculptor and copyist. He executed the Farnese Hercules after the original by Lysippos.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the Farnese Hercules (National Mus., Naples) of Lysippos stood originally in the Baths of Caracalla and later in the Farnese Palace. It is one of more than three dozen copies of this work. Lysippos made numerous statues of Alexander the Great after 340 B.C. According to tradition, he produced 1,500 works. The subjects were gods, heroes, and athletes. The sizes ranged from small bronzes to a statue of Zeus 60 ft (18 m) high.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Aristotle is requested by Lysippos to investigate the presumed abduction of Anthia and Kallirrhoe (53-55), (7) he and Stephanos depart on horseback for Delphi (72).
In this, he was supported by Lysippos and especially by Straton (352, 357).
The Lysippan connection does not necessarily mean that the sculptor was a close follower of Lysippos, since the master's Her akles types were popular all over the Greek world.
It is obviously most intriguing that Ciriaco cites Donatello as one of the heirs of Phidias, Polykleiros, and Lysippos apropos the pair of nude "Panathenaic" riders under discussion above.
One of the first, it seems, was the colossal Herakles by Lysippos, that came from the taking of Taranto, Pliny the Elder, XXXIV, 18 [40].
We are told much about these classical masters: Pheidias who was famous for his colossal gold- and ivory-clad cult-images but also cast bronzes; Polykleitos who theorised about ideal proportions in his treatise called the Canon; Myron who was particularly eulogised for his life-like statues of athletes; and the prolific Lysippos, who worked for Alexander the Great and accomplished a wide range of subjects that included the Apoxyomenos (an athlete scraping oil from his skin) and the intriguingly named 'Intoxicated Flute-Girl' (temulenta tibicina).
The inclusion of a 'signed' statue-base for a sculpture at Corinth made by Lysippos himself is a tantalising reminder of what we are missing and can never fully retrieve.
He went so far as to issue an edict ordering that only two artists could represent him: Apelles in paint, and Lysippos in marble.
Additions include an Attic red-figure cup by Douris, showing the gruesome death of Pentheus as he is torn limb from limb by the women of Thebes, a remarkable Roman bronze head of an athlete after a lost 4th-century BC original by Lysippos, and an Egyptian Old Kingdom funerary sculpture of an official and his family.
HEAD OF AN ATHLETE, HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN, PROBABLY AFTER LYSIPPOS (C.