Lytro camera

Lytro camera

A digital camera from Lytro, Inc. that enabled the picture to be focused after it was taken. Rather than recording light as single amounts, the camera's microlens captured the entire light field, which is the color, intensity and direction of all the light rays. Instead of megapixels, the camera was rated at 11 megarays.

With shipments beginning in 2012, the Lytro was the first commercial product of light field technology, which in the past, required supercomputers to process the images. In 2014, the much larger Lytro Illum DLSR came out that cost USD $1600. A virtual reality version of the Lytro was announced for 2016 delivery; however, two years later, the Mountain View, California company closed its doors. By that time, millions of people were using smartphones and stand-alone cameras were losing their appeal.


Point and Shoot
This original consumer version of the Lytro, which cost USD $400 with 8GB of storage, offered a quick point and shoot because there was no need to focus.







After the Fact
Using software in the camera or computer, the focal plane of the image was selected after the picture was taken. (Images courtesy of Eric Cheng, Director of Photography.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional topics discussed during the evening included cyber security, how to future-proof your career from A.I., women in post-production, Google's purchase of the Lytro camera, the technology "skills gap" and creative strategies and trends in the industry.
As this dataset is captured by a Lytro camera, the experimental results on this dataset can better reflect the pros and cons of the algorithm.
The Illum also looks a lot like a real DSLR, rather than the rather odd pocket kaleidoscopesque appearance of the original Lytro Camera. The Lytro Illum will be available in July 2014 at a retail price of $1600, Extremetech reported.
This technology is similar to that of Lytro camera.
Check out the new Lytro camera, and although it gives a fun and almost toy-like appearance, it is everything but.
In exchange for your Gandhis, you get the elegant Lytro camera that packs an 8X optical zoom along with a fixed f/2.0 lens which is great for low light photography.
That has all changed with the release of the Lytro camera. Simple point-and-shoot design on the outside, complex light-field capturing on the inside yields unique photos that have no fixed focal length.
The swift capture times allow for a quick succession of shots and if the object is not moving fast, users would be able to shoot first and focus later like on a Lytro camera. The MEMS camera, irrespective of the light conditions, locks focus in a fraction of a second and many times faster than regular camera models.
Ng referred to Lytro camera images as "living pictures" because they allow whoever is looking at them, say as a post on a Facebook page, to shift the focus between people or objects captured in photos.
In the department of capturing moments instantaneously, Google's Project Glass even one-ups the picturesque Lytro camera.
In the department of capturing moments instantaneously, Google's "Project Glass" even one-ups the Lytro camera.
Instead, the "living pictures" captured by a Lytro camera can be adjusted to focus on any part of the photo after the fact.