Medea

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Medea

(mĭdē`ə), in Greek mythology, princess of Colchis, skilled in magic and sorcery. She fell in love with JasonJason,
in Greek mythology, son of Aeson. When Pelias usurped the throne of Iolcus and killed (or imprisoned) Aeson and most of his descendants, Jason was smuggled off to the centaur Chiron, who reared him secretly on Mt. Pelion.
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 and helped him, against the will of her father, Aeëtes, to obtain the Golden Fleece. When Jason left Colchis, she fled with him and lived as his wife for many years, bearing him two children. Jason later wished to marry Creusa, daughter of King Creon of Corinth, but Medea sent her an enchanted wedding gown that burned her to death. Medea then completed her revenge by killing her own two children; in another version of the legend the angered citizens of Corinth stoned them to death. Afterward, Medea fled to Athens, where she married King Aegeus.
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Medea

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A priestess of Hecate and niece to Circe, in Greek mythology. She was the daughter of Aeëtes, king of Colchis and was famed for her magical arts. Medea fell in love with Jason and, with magic, helped him acquire the Golden Fleece from her father. However, when Jason betrayed her, she caused the death of their two children and also the death of Jason's second wife. Medea married king Aegeus and by him had a son, Medus.

Medea later married Achilles, in the Elysian fields, and was honored as a god- dess at Corinth, although the chief seat of her cult was Thessaly, the home of magic. She was made immortal by Hera and became known as "the Wise One."

The Witch Book: The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, Wicca, and Neo-paganism © 2002 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Medea

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Medea, asteroid 212 (the 212th asteroid to be discovered, on February 6, 1880), is approximately 132 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.5 years. Medea was named after the princess who helped Jason obtain the Golden Fleece. J. Lee Lehman associates this asteroid with planning strategy, as well as with bringing together seemingly opposed emotions. Jacob Schwartz gives Medea’s astrological influence as “intense emotions and boding with extreme love or hate or both simultaneously.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Medea

 

in Greek mythology, a sorceress and the daughter of Aeetes, king of Colchis. In love with Jason, the leader of the Argonauts, Medea helped him obtain the golden fleece and followed him to Greece. When Jason planned to marry the daughter of the king of Corinth, Medea killed her rival by means of poisoned clothing, murdered her own two children by Jason, and disappeared in a winged chariot sent by her grandfather, Helios.

The story of Medea has inspired works of literature (Euripides, Apollonius of Rhodes, Seneca, P. Corneille, F. Grillparzer, and J. Anouilh), art (Pompeian murals; paintings by E. Delacroix), and music (L. Cherubini and E. Křenek).


Médéa

 

a city in northern Algeria and administrative center of Médéa wilaya. Population, 37,000 (1966). The city is linked by railroad and highway with Algiers, and by a trans-Saharan highway with the city of Zinder in Niger. Médéa is surrounded by vineyards and gardens. Red wines are produced there. Local industries include metalworking and handicrafts (pottery and leather tanning).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Medea

legendary sorceress whose hatred came of jealousy. [Gk. Myth.: Payton, 433]
See: Hatred

Medea

sends husband Jason’s new bride poisoned cloak. [Gk. Lit.: Medea; Fr. Lit.: Médée]

Medea

murdered her two children. [Gk. Lit.: Century Classical, 684–685]
See: Murder

Medea

uses poisoned nightgown to kill Jason’s new wife. [Fr. Opera: Cherubini, Medea, Westerman, 81]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.