Mach

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Mach

Ernst . 1838--1916, Austrian physicist and philosopher. He devised the system of speed measurement using the Mach number. He also founded logical positivism, asserting that the validity of a scientific law is proved only after empirical testing

Mach

Machclick for a larger image
Speed of sound as a function of altitude.
Machclick for a larger image
Refers to a Mach number, or the ratio of the speed of an airplane to the speed of sound in the same atmospheric conditions. It is also used as a speed unit. The speed of sound, or Mach 1, is equal to 340.5 m/s, 661 knots, 761 miles per hour, or 1225.5 km/h at sea level under standard conditions, and it decreases with altitude. Above the tropopause (about 36,090 ft, or 11 km), Mach 1 is 295.5 m/s, 574 knots, 658 miles per hour, or 1063.2 km/h. Named after Ernst Mach (1838–1916).

Mach

An operating system kernel under development at Carnegie-Mellon University to support distributed and parallel computation. Mach is designed to support computing environments consisting of networks of uniprocessors and multiprocessors. Mach is the kernel of the OSF/1.

Mach kernel

A Unix-like operating system developed at Carnegie-Mellon University in the period between 1985 and 1994. It was designed with a microkernel architecture that makes it easily portable to different platforms. Operating systems based on Mach include NextStep, OSF/1 and Mac OS X. See microkernel, Mac OS X and Open Group.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [beta]'s indicate standardized partial regression coefficients; "*" indicates multiplication; gender equals 1 for males and 0 for females; "Mach*Age" indicates the interaction of Mach and age scores.
Model 5 indicates a positive relationship occurs between Mach scores and sales success in the context of stockbrokers selling in a loosely structured organization.
Proposition 2: Gender will interact with MACH levels and performance of salespeople as measured by volume.
For example, Christie and Geis (1970) found one result suggesting high MACH's tend to indiscriminately stereotype both blacks and whites.