MEC

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Related to MECS: MECCS

MEC

(Multi-access Edge Computing) Locating computing and storage functions closer to the end user. MEC used to mean "mobile edge computing" and generally refers to where processing occurs in the carrier's cellular network. To support real-time operations, MEC takes place between the cell towers (radio access network) and the core network. See edge computing, fog computing and RAN.
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References in periodicals archive ?
MECS are typically mesoscopic; that is, approximately between the size of a sugar cube and a fist.
MECs certified 99 (19.8%) deaths and attributed 70 (70.7%) to natural causes.
"MECS remains the only dedicated regional coatings event that gathers producers and distributors with different specialities from across the region" Reinhard added.
Recently, D2-40, an antibody to human podoplanin used often in the breast to identify lymphovascular invasion, has been shown to also stain MECs with a variable degree of intensity.
RESULTS: Noncontact co-culture of MECs and NSCs rapidly ([less than or equal to] 3 weeks) caused hypersecretion of MMPs and marked suppression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN in NSCs.
The compliance offered by MECS server with HIPAA, GLBA and PCI demonstrates the viability of the solution to adequately comply with various international compliance standards, thus making it suitable for diverse sectors worldwide," said Frost & Sullivan Analyst Ahmed Zeffirelli.
On commissioning, we gave examples where Minor Eye Conditions Services (MECS) have provided great care for patients without involving secondary care or GPs and called on NHS England to promote MECS as a national pathway, agree national tariffs, and encourage take up of this service.
With the prostate identified as a possible target tissue of arsenic, the authors of the current study created malignant epithelial cells (MECs) by exposing a normal human prostatic epithelial cell line, RWPE-1, to sodium arsenite.
At the light microscopic level, 2 distinct cell populations can be recognized lining the human mammary ductal and terminal ductolobular units: a luminally located layer of polarized epithelial cells and a basally located layer of myoepithelial cells (MECs).