MIMD


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MIMD

[¦em¦ī¦em¦dē]
(computer science)
A type of multiprocessor architecture in which several instruction cycles may be active at any given time, each independently fetching instructions and operands into multiple processing units and operating on them in a concurrent fashion. Acronym for multiple-instruction-stream, multiple-data-stream.

MIMD

MIMD

(Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream) The instruction execution architecture of a CPU that can process two or more independent sets of instructions simultaneously on two or more sets of data. CPUs with multiple cores are examples of MIMD architecture, each core performing SIMD processing. Hyperthreading also results in a certain degree of MIMD performance. See SIMD and hyperthreading.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MIMD extracts the NTL from the beacon message and compare the present NTL ( ) value with the threshold NTL ( ) value.
MIMD computers support parallel solutions that require processors to operate in a largely autonomous manner.
As NPACI's leading-edge site, SDSC now has a 272-processor Cray T3E system (MIMD, distributed memory) [9], a 128-processor IBM SP (MIMD, distributed memory) [11], and a 14-processor Cray T90 (vector MIMD, shared memory).
MIMD machines find particular use in applications such as image processing and finite element analysis of nonhomogeneous structures.
The IBM SP system is an MIMD machine with distributed local memory (128Mb) attached to each of the 64 processors (P2SC, 120MHz).
7) Note that the SPMD data-parallelism model is opposed to the MIMD (multiple program/data) activation/control-parallelism model.
The second experimental platform is a 64-processor Parsytec GCel [Langhammer 1992], an 8 x 8 mesh-connected MIMD computer.
In the 1980s and 1990s, several general-purpose MIMD computers were developed using microprocessors connected through a communication network or shared memory space.
Then, we developed a blocked version of the Level 3 BLAS for MIMD vector multiprocessors [Amestoy and Dayde 1993; Dayde et al.
These alternatives are called distributed-memory MIMD and shared-memory MIMD, respectively and are illustrated in Figure 1.
The target machine is assumed to be a MIMD architecture.